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AnimalID

Name

5024

Black Rhinocerous

LocationName:

Africa

Origin:

Original ZT

PurchaseCost:

$1,200

RequiresResearch:

No

IsClimber:

No

IsJumper:

No

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Description:

The native habitat of the black rhinoceros is the wide savannah of central and southern Africa. Black rhinos can be found in South Africa, Zimbabwe, and Namibia. After the elephant, the rhinoceros is the second largest land creature. The black rhino can stand more than five feet tall and weigh as much as 4,000 pounds. This species is distinguished by two horns and a hooked prehensile upper lip. The black rhino's hide is actually gray, but often looks darker due to a coating of black mud.

The rhino's horn, coupled with its massive size and volatile temperament, make it a dangerous creature to mess with. They have poor eyesight but an acute sense of smell and hearing. They are aggressive animals that can charge at a speed up to 30 miles per hour when feeling threatened. Before charging, an agitated rhino will make a distinctive snorting call, often while shaking its head and stamping its feet. Occasionally, a hyena will manage to take down a baby rhino. Other than hyenas, the rhino's only enemy is man.

The rhino has roamed the earth for over 50 million years, making it one of the most venerable species in existence. Venerable has given way to vulnerable; the black rhino is currently one of the most critically endangered animals on the planet. Since 1970, the black rhino population has declined 90 percent. Today, the entire black rhino population consists of about 2,700 animals. Their main value to poachers rests in their horns, which are a valuable ingredient in Asian medicine and are also prized for making daggers in Yemen. Another threat to this creature is the ongoing destruction of its habitat.

The black rhinoceros prefers hilly areas with a dense coverage of shrubs and trees, rather than the large, open areas of the savannah. In the wild, the rhino feeds on bark, leaves, twigs, and the occasional wild fruit. A browser, this animal is known to consume more than 200 different kinds of plants and herbs. In captivity, rhinos can be fed alfalfa and hay, oats, horse feed, and mixed vegetables. Large animals, they tend to dirty their exhibits more quickly than other animals. Their size also means that rhinos tend to need larger exhibits. These creatures also require a plentiful supply of fresh water.

The rhino is a solitary animal, coming together with its own kind only to mate. These animals can sometimes be found in small family groups, usually a female and her young. In captivity, it is unusual to find more than two rhinos in one exhibit. The rhino's nature also means that enclosure with other species will tend to make it nervous and upset.

Black rhino calves are born in heavy cover and stay hidden for up to a week. After leaving cover, they walk behind their mothers. Young rhinos may stay with their mother for 3 to 4 years, or until the next calf is born, at which time they are driven off. Although rhinos can live up to 45 years in captivity, they rarely reproduce under these conditions.

Rhinos are most active early and late in the day and tend to wallow in mud during the hottest part of the day. The mud both cools off the rhino—a necessary measure due to its lack of sweat glands—and provides a barrier to repel annoying insects. The rhino's skin hosts many external parasites, which are eaten by the tick birds and egrets that live with the rhino. These birds provide an additional benefit in that their startled flight alerts the rhino to potential danger. Rather sedentary by nature, a contented rhino can often be seen lying in the sun.

Attractiveness Adult:

Attractiveness Young:

Initial Happiness:

Habitat Preference:

10

30

70

70

Captivity:

Crowd:

CrowdHappiness Change:

ClimbsCliffs:

5

30

-5

No

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

To build a good animal exhibit you need to ask a few questions: (click them for the answers)

Which fence is suitable for this animal in terms of strength, if it can be climbed or jumped over?

How big should the exhibit be and what Terrain should be used?

What foliage should be used?

What rocks should be used?

What shelter does the animal need?

What toy does the animal like?

How deep should the exhibit be if using the "Pit Method"?

1 level

 

FenceName

Purchase Cost

Height

Strength

Life

Cost Effective

Low Chain-link Fence

$45

1

200

10

22.2

Low Stick Pole Fence

$55

1

225

11

20.0

Stick Pole Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Stick Pole Window Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Low Post and Rail Fence

$70

1

250

11

15.7

Chain-link Fence

$70

2

200

10

14.3

Post and Rail Fence

$90

2

250

12

13.3

Low Wooden Slat Fence

$85

1

240

11

12.9

Wood Slat Window Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Wooden Slat Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Low Concrete Fence

$125

1

300

12

9.6

Low Iron Bar Fence

$125

1

290

12

9.6

Low Rock Wall Fence

$125

1

280

12

9.6

Low Concrete Chain Fence

$125

1

275

12

9.6

Low Plexiglas Fence

$125

1

270

12

9.6

Rock Wall Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Rock Window Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Concrete Chain Fence

$150

2

275

14

9.3

Plexiglas Fence

$150

2

270

13

8.7

Iron Bar Fence

$180

2

290

14

7.8

Concrete Fence

$200

2

300

15

7.5

Reinforced Concrete Fence

$225

3

460

16

7.1

Reinforced Concrete and Glass Fence

$225

3

420

15

6.7

Concrete and Iron Bar Fence

$240

3

440

15

6.3

Electrified Chain-link Fence

$300

3

480

18

6.0

Electrified Iron Bar Fence

$350

3

400

18

5.1

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Animal Density

Min

Number of Animals/Exhibit

Max

50

1

 

2

Terrain Name

Value

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Savannah Grass

85

43

85

128

170

213

255

298

340

383

425

Dirt

10

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

50

Fresh Water
5
3
5
8
10
13
15
18
20
23
25

Rocks

2

4

8

12

16

20

24

28

32

36

40

Foliage

9

5

9

14

18

23

27

32

36

41

45

Elevation

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Exhibit Size

100

50

100

150

200

250

300

350

400

450

500

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

TreeName

Foliage Effect

Cost/ Square

Cost Effective

7058

7

Umbrella Thorn Tree

40

$840

4.8

7048

3

Thorn Bush

24

$80

30.0

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

RockName

Size X

Size Y

Rock

Rock Effect

Purchase Cost

Cost Effective

9206

2

Small Rock

1

1

Yes

8

$55

14.5

9205

2

Medium Rock 

1

1

Yes

8

$75

10.7

9200

4

Large Rock

2

2

Yes

4

$150

2.7

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Shelter ID

Shelter Name

Shelter Value

Shelter Effect

Purchase Cost

Capacity

Requires Research

8115

Large Stable

24

14

$700

5

Yes

8112

Large Wood Shelter 

20

10

$325

6

Yes

8109

Large Concrete Shelter

20

10

$225

6

Yes

8114

Stable

20

10

$500

3

 

8111

Wood Shelter

16

6

$225

4

 

8108

Concrete Shelter

16

6

$175

4

 

8113

Small Stable

16

6

$300

2

 

8107

Small Concrete Shelter

13

3

$125

2

 

8110

Small Wood Shelter

13

3

$175

2

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ToyID

ToyName

ToyValue

PurchaseCost

 

None

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ReproductionChance:

High

SickChance:

5

ReproductionInterval(months):

9

SickChange:

-10

HappyReproduceThreshold:

90

DeathChance:

10

Offspring:

1

TimeDeath(months):

47

BabyToAdult(months):

6

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Compatible Animals

Prey Animals

Thomsons Gazelle

8

KeeperFoodType:

Grass and branches

African Buffalo

8

None

Common Wildebeest

8

 

Hippopotamus

8

 

Giraffe

8

 

Okapi

0

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?