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AnimalID

Name

5028

Okapi

LocationName:

Africa

Origin:

Original ZT

PurchaseCost:

$1,800

RequiresResearch:

Yes

IsClimber:

No

IsJumper:

Yes

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Description:

The okapi is a shorter-necked relative of the giraffe, standing just 5 to 6 feet high. Okapis are found in the tropical rainforests of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, which contains an Okapi Wildlife Reserve. About 5,000 of the estimated 30,000 living okapis are thought to dwell there, protected by the government. Okapis are found in the densest parts of the rainforest at middle elevations. They tend to frequent river banks and stream beds.

Like the giraffe, the male okapi has two small, skin-covered horns. It has a striking appearance: a coat ranging from reddish-brown to almost black, with zebra-like stripes on its flanks and upper legs, white upper legs, and a creamy face. The okapi's coloring provides it with excellent camouflage in the forest. Its ability to hide itself, its shy and solitary nature, its relative scarcity, its nocturnal habit, its keen sense of smell and hearing, and its speed at making getaways-all combine to make the okapi a difficult animal to study in the wild. Discovered in 1901, this animal was the last large land animal to be found by Europeans. Okapis are still rare in zoos.

Okapis are herbivores, feeding on grass, fruit, new growth, and leaves in the wild. Their zoo diet consists of hay, grain, and browse. The okapi's extremely long and sticky tongue not only enables it to easily strip leaves and twigs off branches, but also allows it to groom itself thoroughly. They can even reach their eyes and ears using their tongues! The okapi's clean habits are a big help to zookeepers: when an okapi needs medication, the keeper will pour it over the animal's back, and the okapi will immediately lick it off. Okapi are prone to parasitic infestation.

Okapi spend most of their time grazing and chewing their cuds. Social grooming and play behavior seem to be common for both young and adults. Whereas the okapi's cousin, the giraffe, is almost mute, the okapi has a cow-like call. Young okapis will bleat for their mothers, and females in heat will bellow to attract males. Okapi are difficult animals to keep happy in captivity, due to their shy and solitary natures. Angry or unhappy animals will pace agitatedly while tossing their heads and pawing the ground.

Okapis are solitary creatures. In the wild, okapi generally travel alone or in mother-offspring pairs. Adult okapis get together only to mate. In zoos, okapi are generally kept in male-female pairs, in the hope that they will reproduce. Okapis are very difficult animals to breed in captivity.

An okapi mother bears a single calf, which is kept hidden for two weeks. Newborn okapis will spend a day or so following their mothers, and then find a hiding spot in which to make a nest. For the next two months, they will spend 80 percent of their time in this nest. By nursing relatively infrequently and not defecating during this period, the young okapi is less likely to be discovered by predators. A threatened calf will lie motionless in its nest, while its mother rushes aggressively to its defense.

The okapi are prey for large hunting cats, such as leopards. An even bigger threat to the okapi is the one posed by human poaching and destruction of habitat.

 

Attractiveness Adult:

Attractiveness Young:

Initial Happiness:

Habitat Preference:

50

150

20

80

Captivity:

Crowd:

CrowdHappiness Change:

ClimbsCliffs:

12

10

-10

No

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

To build a good animal exhibit you need to ask a few questions: (click them for the answers)

Which fence is suitable for this animal in terms of strength, if it can be climbed or jumped over?

How big should the exhibit be and what Terrain should be used?

What foliage should be used?

What rocks should be used?

What shelter does the animal need?

What toy does the animal like?

How deep should the exhibit be if using the "Pit Method"?

1 level

 

FenceName

Purchase Cost

Height

Strength

Life

Cost Effective

Stick Pole Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Stick Pole Window Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Chain-link Fence

$70

2

200

10

14.3

Post and Rail Fence

$90

2

250

12

13.3

Wood Slat Window Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Wooden Slat Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Rock Wall Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Rock Window Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Concrete Chain Fence

$150

2

275

14

9.3

Plexiglas Fence

$150

2

270

13

8.7

Iron Bar Fence

$180

2

290

14

7.8

Concrete Fence

$200

2

300

15

7.5

Reinforced Concrete Fence

$225

3

460

16

7.1

Reinforced Concrete and Glass Fence

$225

3

420

15

6.7

Concrete and Iron Bar Fence

$240

3

440

15

6.3

Electrified Chain-link Fence

$300

3

480

18

6.0

Electrified Iron Bar Fence

$350

3

400

18

5.1

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Animal Density

Min

Number of Animals/Exhibit

Max

20

1

 

2

Terrain Name

Value

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Rainforest floor

85

17

34

51

68

85

102

119

136

153

170

Grass

8

2

3

5

6

8

10

11

13

14

16

Dirt

5

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Fresh water

2

0

1

1

2

2

2

3

3

4

4

Rocks

1

1

2

2

3

4

5

6

6

7

8

Foliage

20

4

8

12

16

20

24

28

32

36

40

Elevation

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Exhibit Size

100

20

40

60

80

100

120

140

160

180

200

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

TreeName

Foliage Effect

Cost/ Square

Cost Effective

7049

12

Rainforest Bush

60

$200

30.0

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

RockName

Size X

Size Y

Rock

Rock Effect

Purchase Cost

Cost Effective

9206

2

Small Rock

1

1

Yes

8

$55

14.5

9205

2

Medium Rock 

1

1

Yes

8

$75

10.7

9200

2

Large Rock

2

2

Yes

2

$150

1.3

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Shelter ID

Shelter Name

Shelter Value

Shelter Effect

Purchase Cost

Capacity

Requires Research

8106

Large Lean-to

25

15

$650

9

Yes

8105

Lean-to

20

10

$450

4

 

8112

Large Wood Shelter 

19

9

$325

6

Yes

8111

Wood Shelter

16

6

$225

4

 

8109

Large Concrete Shelter

16

6

$225

6

Yes

8104

Small Lean-to

15

5

$250

2

 

8108

Concrete Shelter

14

4

$175

4

 

8110

Small Wood Shelter

13

3

$175

2

 

8107

Small Concrete Shelter

12

2

$125

2

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ToyID

ToyName

ToyValue

PurchaseCost

 

none

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ReproductionChance:

Low

SickChance:

12

ReproductionInterval(months):

9

SickChange:

-10

HappyReproduceThreshold:

97

DeathChance:

10

Offspring:

1

TimeDeath(months):

24

BabyToAdult(months):

4

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Compatible Animals

Prey Animals

Thomsons Gazelle

0

KeeperFoodType:

Grass and branches

Gemsbok

0

none

Giraffe

0

Hippopotamus

0

Common Wildebeest

0

African Buffalo

0

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?