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AnimalID

Name

5048

Arctic Wolf

LocationName:

Arctic

Origin:

Original ZT

PurchaseCost:

$1,150

RequiresResearch:

No

IsClimber:

No

IsJumper:

Yes

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Description:

The Arctic wolf is a subspecies of the gray wolf. Arctic wolves have white coats, which are thicker than the coats of southern wolves. Their ears are smaller and more rounded, their muzzles are slightly shorter, and their legs are noticeably shorter. They are also heavier in build, with a full-grown male weighing as much as 175 pounds.

Arctic wolves live on the islands of the Canadian Arctic and on the northern coast of Greenland, roughly north of 70 North latitude. They inhabit a harsh world comprised of tundra, glacier valleys, and ice fields. The ground in these regions is permanently frozen. Arctic wolves are able to endure temperatures as low as -70 F. Due to its isolation, this wolf is the purest of all the wolf breeds.

As the terrain of Arctic wolves is both inhospitable and inaccessible, little is known about their behavior in the wild, especially during the long, dark winter months. Even the vast majority of Inuit live further south than the Arctic wolf. Research conducted during the summer indicates that much of the Arctic wolf's behavior is the same as that of its southern cousin. Pack solidarity among Arctic wolves seems greater, probably due to the fact that a lone wolf is unlikely to survive in this environment. In the wild, the Arctic wolf generally lives about seven years, whereas in captivity, it can live over 17 years.

Arctic wolves will eat any animal that they can catch: from voles, lemmings, hares, and birds, to caribou and musk oxen. When seeking larger prey, they must hunt together in packs, as caribou and musk oxen are too powerful for any one wolf to bring down alone. Since there is little cover in this region, the wolves must approach an alerted herd that has already formed a defensive circle, with the calves in the center. The wolf pack circles the herd, trying to force it to scatter so that the wolves can isolate the young or weak members. A single musk ox will provide enough food to last the wolves several days. Arctic wolves consume every part of their prey, including the skin, fur, and bones.

Wolves usually live in small packs or family groups of seven to ten individuals, consisting of a breeding pair, their cubs, and their offspring. The two dominant wolves are the alpha male and female, and the other pack members defer to them. Wolves communicate through postures and expressions as well as with growls, howls, whimpers, whines, and barks. A single, subtle body movement can express volumes. A wolf will flatten its ears against the side of its head when afraid, and bare its teeth when angry. Subordination is shown by lowering body and tail, or by rolling on the back. A playful wolf will dance around and lower the front part of its body, leaving the back part raised.

After mating in March, the pregnant female leaves the pack to find a den in which to give birth. The cubs are born deaf, blind, and helpless. They are totally dependent on their mother, and she in turn relies on her mate to bring her food. All the adults in the pack cooperate in feeding and caring for the cubs. By the following year, they may be ready to leave the pack.

The Arctic wolf is the only subspecies of wolf that not only is not threatened, but is still found throughout the whole of its historical range. Their remote habitat has served to protect them from the human threat that has brought other wolf populations so close to extinction.

Attractiveness Adult:

Attractiveness Young:

Initial Happiness:

Habitat Preference:

15

45

50

85

Captivity:

Crowd:

CrowdHappiness Change:

ClimbsCliffs:

8

20

-5

Yes

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

To build a good animal exhibit you need to ask a few questions: (click them for the answers)

Which fence is suitable for this animal in terms of strength, if it can be climbed or jumped over?

How big should the exhibit be and what Terrain should be used?

What foliage should be used?

What rocks should be used?

What shelter does the animal need?

What toy does the animal like?

How deep should the exhibit be if using the "Pit Method"?

1 level

 

FenceName

Purchase Cost

Height

Strength

Life:

Cost Effective

Stick Pole Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Stick Pole Window Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Chain-link Fence

$70

2

200

10

14.3

Post and Rail Fence

$90

2

250

12

13.3

Wood Slat Window Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Wooden Slat Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Rock Wall Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Rock Window Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Concrete Chain Fence

$150

2

275

14

9.3

Plexiglas Fence

$150

2

270

13

8.7

Iron Bar Fence

$180

2

290

14

7.8

Concrete Fence

$200

2

300

15

7.5

Reinforced Concrete Fence

$225

3

460

16

7.1

Reinforced Concrete and Glass Fence

$225

3

420

15

6.7

Concrete and Iron Bar Fence

$240

3

440

15

6.3

Electrified Chain-link Fence

$300

3

480

18

6.0

Electrified Iron Bar Fence

$350

3

400

18

5.1

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Animal Density:

Min

Number of Animals/Exhibit

Max

35

4

 

20

Terrain Name

Value

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Snow

80

28

56

84

112

140

168

196

224

252

280

Gray stone

15

5

11

16

21

26

32

37

42

47

53

Fresh water

5

2

4

5

7

9

11

12

14

16

18

Rocks

8

11

22

34

45

56

67

78

90

101

112

Foliage

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Elevation

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Exhibit Size

100

35

70

105

140

175

210

245

280

315

350

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

TreeName

Foliage Effect

Cost/ Square

Cost Effective

 

 

none

 

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

RockName

Size X

Size Y

Rock

Rock Effect

Purchase Cost

Cost Effective

9219

3

Small Snowy Rock

1

1

Yes

24

$75

32.0

9218

3

Medium Snowy Rock 

1

1

Yes

24

$85

28.2

9220

7

Large Snowy Rock

2

2

Yes

10

$175

5.7

9221

7

Large Snowy Rock

2

2

Yes

10

$185

5.4

9211

7

Snowy Rock Formation

8

2

 

10

$700

1.4

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Shelter ID

Shelter Name

Shelter Value

Shelter Effect

Purchase Cost

Capacity

Requires Research

8102

Snowy Rock Cave

25

15

$600

4

Yes

8109

Large Concrete Shelter

20

10

$225

6

Yes

8108

Concrete Shelter

19

9

$175

4

 

8112

Large Wood Shelter 

18

8

$325

6

Yes

8107

Small Concrete Shelter

17

7

$125

2

 

8111

Wood Shelter

16

6

$225

4

 

8110

Small Wood Shelter

13

3

$175

2

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ToyID

ToyName

ToyValue

PurchaseCost

 

None

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ReproductionChance:

High

SickChance:

10

ReproductionInterval(months):

5

SickChange:

-15

HappyReproduceThreshold:

95

DeathChance:

45

Offspring:

2

TimeDeath(months):

12

BabyToAdult(months):

3

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Compatible Animals

Prey Animals

Gray Wolf

0

KeeperFoodType:

Meat

 

 

Giant Panda

Chimpanzee

Plains Zebra

Thomsons Gazelle

Olive Baboon

Mandrill

Lowland Gorilla

Red Kangaroo

Common Wildebeest

Ibex

Okapi

Moose

Gemsbok

American Bighorn Sheep

Giraffe

Dromedary Camel

Markhor

Greater Flamingo

Ostrich

Emporer Penguin

California Sea Lion

Giant Anteater

African Warthog

Black Buck

Bongo

Sable Antelope

Man

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?