Make your own free website on Tripod.com

AnimalID

Name

5015

Gray Wolf

LocationName:

North America

Origin:

Original ZT

PurchaseCost:

$900

RequiresResearch:

No

IsClimber:

No

IsJumper:

Yes

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Description:

As the largest member of the dog family, a gray wolf can weigh anywhere from 70 to 115 pounds and is bigger than the average German shepherd dog. The coat of the gray wolf can actually range in color from pure white to coal black. It is believed that all dogs are descended from Middle Eastern wolves that were tamed around 12,000 years ago.

The gray wolf ranges worldwide, with populations in the United States, Canada, Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and Russia. Although gray wolves were once numerous across the North American continent, today they are found primarily in regions of northern Canada and parts of Mexico. There are fewer than 2,500 wolves in the continental United States. These are mostly in the forested areas of Northern Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

Wolves prefer heavily forested areas, but can also be found in desert, plains, and tundra regions. In captivity, their exhibits are generally a mix of forest and grassy areas.

In their natural setting, wolves need a lot of space. The hunting territory of a gray wolf may range between 50 and 1,000 square miles, depending on food availability. Wolves sometimes travel 30 miles in a single day. Because wolves need wilderness territory and an abundant food supply, the destruction of habitat has become a leading threat to their survival in the wild. In captivity, wolves have specific habitat requirements and will be unhappy if these are not met.

Wolves in the wild are afraid of humans and generally avoid contact with them. There are no documented instances of healthy wolves attacking humans in North America. Other than the loss of habitat, the biggest threats to the wolf's survival are illegal hunting, trapping, and poisoning.

Wolves are social animals, living together in dens. Packs usually consist of a set of parents, their offspring, and other non-breeding adults. In the wild, wolf packs can range in size from 8 to 35 animals. The wolf's social system is strictly ordered; within each pack, there is a male and a female hierarchy. The highest-ranking male is called the alpha male, and the top female is the alpha female. Wolves can mate for life.

Wolves are highly intelligent and communicate with each other by scent marking, facial and body language, and vocalizations. Howling helps them keep track of each other, establish territories, assemble the pack, and defend a kill. They may also howl just for enjoyment. On a calm night, howls can be heard from as far away as 120 miles.

In addition to a finely developed sense of hearing, wolves have a keen sense of smell and are capable of detecting prey more than a mile away. Wolves are carnivores and will normally hunt as a pack. Gray wolves will hunt large animals such as moose and deer. Wolves can help to keep a prey population robust by eliminating the old, sick, weak, or injured animals. The loss of wolves in the wild has led to the overpopulation of certain species. Wolves will also eat beaver, rabbits, and even mice.

Wolves run on their toes. This lengthens their legs, making it possible for them to run faster and turn more quickly. In captivity, angry wolves will shake their heads, growl, and run about their exhibit. They may also bark and howl in frustration

Attractiveness Adult:

Attractiveness Young:

Initial Happiness:

Habitat Preference:

10

30

50

80

Captivity:

Crowd:

CrowdHappiness Change:

ClimbsCliffs:

8

20

-5

No

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

To build a good animal exhibit you need to ask a few questions: (click them for the answers)

Which fence is suitable for this animal in terms of strength, if it can be climbed or jumped over?

How big should the exhibit be and what Terrain should be used?

What foliage should be used?

What rocks should be used?

What shelter does the animal need?

What toy does the animal like?

How deep should the exhibit be if using the "Pit Method"?

1 level

 

FenceName

Purchase Cost

Height

Strength

Life

Cost Effective

Stick Pole Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Stick Pole Window Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Chain-link Fence

$70

2

200

10

14.3

Post and Rail Fence

$90

2

250

12

13.3

Wood Slat Window Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Wooden Slat Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Rock Wall Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Rock Window Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Concrete Chain Fence

$150

2

275

14

9.3

Plexiglas Fence

$150

2

270

13

8.7

Iron Bar Fence

$180

2

290

14

7.8

Concrete Fence

$200

2

300

15

7.5

Reinforced Concrete Fence

$225

3

460

16

7.1

Reinforced Concrete and Glass Fence

$225

3

420

15

6.7

Concrete and Iron Bar Fence

$240

3

440

15

6.3

Electrified Chain-link Fence

$300

3

480

18

6.0

Electrified Iron Bar Fence

$350

3

400

18

5.1

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Animal Density

Min

Number of Animals/Exhibit

Max

35

2

 

10

Terrain Name

Value

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Coniferous floor

50

18

35

53

70

88

105

123

140

158

175

Grass

25

9

18

26

35

44

53

61

70

79

88

Deciduous floor

20

7

14

21

28

35

42

49

56

63

70

Fresh water

5

2

4

5

7

9

11

12

14

16

18

Rocks

2

3

6

8

11

14

17

20

22

25

28

Foliage

14

5

10

15

20

25

29

34

39

44

49

Elevation

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Exhibit Size

100

35

70

105

140

175

210

245

280

315

350

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

TreeName

Foliage Effect

Cost/ Square

Cost Effective

7023

7

Spruce Tree

40

$580

6.9

7024

2

Yellow Cedar Tree

20

$580

3.4

7009

2

Lodgepole Pine Tree

20

$640

3.1

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

RockName

Size X

Size Y

Rock

Rock Effect

Purchase Cost

Cost Effective

9206

2

Small Rock

1

1

Yes

8

$55

14.5

9205

2

Medium Rock 

1

1

Yes

8

$75

10.7

9225

4

Coniferous Forest Rock

6

4

Yes

7

$310

2.3

9200

4

Large Rock

2

2

Yes

4

$150

2.7

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Shelter ID

Shelter Name

Shelter Value

Shelter Effect

Purchase Cost

Capacity

Requires Research

8100

Rock Cave

20

10

$500

4

Yes

8112

Large Wood Shelter 

18

8

$325

6

Yes

8109

Large Concrete Shelter

18

8

$225

6

Yes

8111

Wood Shelter

16

6

$225

4

 

8108

Concrete Shelter

16

6

$175

4

 

8107

Small Concrete Shelter

13

3

$125

2

 

8110

Small Wood Shelter

13

3

$175

2

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ToyID

ToyName

ToyValue

PurchaseCost

 

 none

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ReproductionChance:

High

SickChance:

3

ReproductionInterval(months):

5

SickChange:

-15

HappyReproduceThreshold:

95

DeathChance:

30

Offspring:

2

TimeDeath(months):

47

BabyToAdult(months):

5

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Compatible Animals

Prey Animals

none

KeeperFoodType:

Meat

 

Giant Panda

Chimpanzee

Plains Zebra

Thomsons Gazelle

Olive Baboon

Mandrill

Lowland Gorilla

Red Kangaroo

Common Wildebeest

Ibex

Okapi

Moose

Gemsbok

American Bighorn Sheep

Giraffe

Dromedary Camel

Markhor

Greater Flamingo

Ostrich

Emporer Penguin

California Sea Lion

Giant Anteater

African Warthog

Black Buck

Bongo

Sable Antelope

Man

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?