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AnimalID

Name

5410

Tiger Shark

LocationName:

Tropical Oceans Worldwide

Origin:

Marine Mania expansion

PurchaseCost:

$1,800

RequiresResearch:

No

IsClimber:

No

IsJumper:

No

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Description:

The tiger shark may very well be the most dangerous shark in the world. Fishermen catching these monsters (up to 21 feet in length) on hook and reel have found human body parts in the stomachs of these sharks. The tiger shark (or Galeocerdo cuvier) is named for the fierce stripes that characterize young adult animals of the species, giving it a resemblance to one of the most dangerous predators on land.

Although most at home in tropical waters, the tiger shark can be found along the coasts of subtropical and even temperate waters. These sharks prefer to feed near shore, even entering river mouths and estuaries on occasion. Unless they are mating, the tiger shark travels alone, generally staying within a home range of about 500 square miles. Within the range, they will swim as deep as 1,200 feet, although they are usually found closer to the surface. Although they do not seek out humans, they will not hesitate to kill them if threatened. Some attacks on humans may be a result of these animals mistaking swimmers or surfers for seals or sea lions.

Although the dark stripes of the juvenile tiger shark fade as the animal enters adulthood, the tiger shark is still striking in appearance. Adult members of the species are gray to brown with an off-white belly. These animals average 10 feet in length but can grow to be considerably longer. The largest tiger shark ever caught weighed in at 1,314 pounds, and heavier tiger sharks may be out there. These sharks are characterized by their wide mounts and broad noses, as well as the barrel-like shape of their chests. The first dorsal fin (the pointed fin that most people associate with sharks) is longer than the second.

The omnivorous tiger shark will eat anything, literally. The preferred diet of the tiger shark consists of food like fish, turtles, crabs, clams, mammals, sea birds, reptiles, and other sharks. However, these animals will scavenge for prey, and have even been found with some non-food items in their digestive systems. Among the more unusual things consumed by tiger sharks are boat cushions, clothing, nuts, bolts, and wire.

The saw-edged, slightly curved teeth of the tiger shark allow them to bite off chunks of food that can be swallowed whole. Since the strong jaws of these sharks can bite a turtle carapace in half, with the rolling motion peculiar to the bite of a shark, needing to swallow food whole doesnít limit the prey of these animals. As these powerful teeth wear out, they are replaced throughout the lifetime of the animal.

Like all sharks, the tiger shark has thick skin made up of two layers. The top layer is the epidermis and the bottom layer is the dermis. Ancient sharks were covered by large plated scales that served as armor, but modern sharks have dermal denticles instead. These dermal denticles are long, pointy, spines that come up through both layers of skin and are common to all sharks. The denticle of the tiger shark comes through the dermis with an anchor plate at the base and then extends through the epidermis as well. The point of the denticle is covered with a layer of dentine and then one of enamel, making it one of the hardest substances in nature. These small spikes replace themselves continually as they wear out, much like the teeth of the shark. They also vary in size and shape depending on the part of the animal they are covering, helping to make the shark more hydrodynamic.

The tiger shark is ovoviviparous. This means that rather than being laid in egg sacs, the eggs hatch within the motherís body. Although between 10 and 82 pups can hatch at once, the sibling cannibalism practiced by these animals reduces the birth rate greatly. The first born in each litter first eats many or all of its siblings, fighting to be the strongest embryo. When the weaker embryos have been consumed, the embryonic tiger sharks will eat unfertilized eggs that the mother releases into her uterus for this purpose.

 

Attractiveness Adult:

Attractiveness Young:

Initial Happiness:

Habitat Preference:

80
90
75
70

Captivity:

Crowd:

CrowdHappiness Change:

ClimbsCliffs:

20
35
-5
No

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

To build a good animal exhibit you need to ask a few questions: (click them for the answers)

Which tank wall is suitable for this animal?     Remember that all tanks need a tank filter!

How big should the exhibit be and what Depth should the tank be?

What foliage should be used?

What rocks should be used?

What shelter does the animal need?

What toy does the animal like?

Does this animal perform in a show?

No

 

TankWallName

Purchase Cost

See Through

Height

Strength

Life

Cost Effective

Concrete Edge and Glass

$125

Yes

3

500

13

10.4

Atlantean Tank Wall

$125

Yes

3

500

13

10.4

Solid Concrete

$125

No

3

500

13

10.4

Black Bar and Glass

$130

Yes

3

500

13

10.0

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Animal Density

Min

Number of Animals/Exhibit

Max

20

1

 

6

TankDepth
8
 
28

Terrain Name

Value

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Saltwater
100
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
200

Rocks

14
11
22
34
45
56
67
78
90
101
112

Foliage

16
3
6
10
13
16
19
22
26
29
32

Exhibit Size

100
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
200

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

TreeName

Foliage Effect

Cost/ Square

Cost Effective

7407
8
Feather Duster Worm
8
$120
6.7
7417
6
Sea Grass
6
$100
6.0
7419
6
Stove Pipe Sponge
6
$150
4.0
7406
6
Divercate Tree Coral
6
$125
4.8
7408
6
Fire Coral
6
$150
4.0
7416
3
Seaweed
3
$100
3.0
7409
3
Kelp
3
$125
2.4
7404
3
Clam Bed
3
$125
2.4
7405
3
Orange Cup Coral
3
$155
1.9
7401
3
Barnacles
3
$75
4.0
7415
3
Sea Star
3
$125
2.4
7410
3
Sea Lettuce
3
$110
2.7

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

RockName

Size X

Size Y

Rock

Rock Effect

Purchase Cost

Cost Effective

9235
6
Small Ocean Floor Rock
1
1
Yes
24
$100
24.0
9239
6
Large Coral Formation
4
6
Yes
6
$175
3.4
9236
6
Medium Coral Formation
4
4
Yes
6
$150
4.0
9238
6
Medium Ocean Floor Rock
2
2
Yes
6
$150
4.0
9241
6
Isle Rock
8
8
Yes
6
$150
4.0
9237
6
Large Ocean Floor Rock
4
4
Yes
6
$165
3.6

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Shelter ID

Shelter Name

Shelter Value

Shelter Effect

Purchase Cost

Capacity

Requires Research
8136
Sunken Ship
12
2
$800
4
No

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ToyID

ToyName

ToyValue

PurchaseCost

6466
Fake Clam
100
$185
6468
Treasure Chest
100
$185
6470
Deep Sea Diver
100
$200

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ReproductionChance:

High

SickChance:

5

ReproductionInterval(months):

9

SickChange:

-12

HappyReproduceThreshold:

96

DeathChance:

10

Offspring:

4

TimeDeath(months):

36

BabyToAdult(months):

4

 

 

SkipTrickHappiness:

 

SkipTrickChance:

 

 

SalinityChange:

-10

SalinityHealthChange:

-20

PooWaterImpact:

5

MurkyWaterThreshold:

60

MurkyWaterChange:

-5

MurkyWaterHealthChange:

-5

VeryMurkyWaterThreshold:

20

ExtremelyMurkyWaterThreshold

1

VeryMurkyWaterChange:

-10

ExtremelyMurkyWaterChange

-15

VeryMurkyWaterHealthChange:

-10

ExtremelyMurkyWaterHealthChange:

-15

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Compatible Animals

Prey Animals

Hammerhead Shark 10

KeeperFoodType:

Chum
Shortfin Mako Shark 10 Polar Bear
  Bengal Tiger
Siberian Tiger
Grizzly Bear
Emporer Penguin
California Sea Lion
Saltwater Crocodile
White Bengal Tiger
Giant Tortoise (Meiolania)
Bottlenose Dolphin
Lion's Mane Jelly
Elephant Seal
Narwhal
Harbor Porpoise
Green Moray Eel
Beluga
Southern Sea Otter
Pacific Octopus
West Indian Manatee
Pacific Walrus
Manta Ray
Green Sea Turtle
Swordfish
Bluefin Tuna
Great Barracuda
Mermaid
Man

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?