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AnimalID

Name

5409

Hammerhead Shark

LocationName:

Tropical Oceans Worldwide

Origin:

Marine Mania expansion

PurchaseCost:

$1,250

RequiresResearch:

No

IsClimber:

No

IsJumper:

No

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Description:

The great hammerhead shark, or Sphyrna mokarran, is the largest of the nine species of hammerheads. Hammerheads are a distinct group of sharks with a wide, flat, almost rectangular head with eyes at the sides. The great hammerhead is one of the largest of the predatory sharks. The great hammerhead averages eleven feet in length, but has been known to grow up to 20 feet long, weighing anywhere from 500 to 1000 pounds. The first dorsal fin is very tall and pointed. This is the triangular fin associated with sharks by most people. Hammerheads have a second, shorter dorsal fin. Despite being shorter, this fin can still be as long as five percent of the shark’s total body length.

The "hammer" of these sharks is clearly their distinguishing feature. The head is often slightly indented in the center of the rectangular hammer, and the head can make up to a quarter of the shark’s total length. This large head can be moved up and down as well as side to side due to specially developed muscles in the head and neck. Besides expanding the shark’s visual range, the hammer-shaped head may be an important part of the shark’s electroreceptive system.

Electroreception is the ability of some sharks and a small number of other aquatic animals to detect electrical signals as they travel through the water. Any muscle contraction by any animal creates an electrical signal (including the contractions of a beating heart), and water conducts electricity extremely well. Sharks use small organs called "ampullae of Lorenzini" to detect these electric fields. An ampulla is a pore with a jelly-filled pit below it. Hairless sensory cells in these pits are stimulated by electrical signals and send information about them to the shark’s brain to be processed, along with auditory, visual, and olfactory inputs. There are several uses for this sense. A shark that cannot see or smell can still find a flatfish buried in the mud using this sense. And since this sense is over one hundred times more sensitive than is needed to detect a resting fish, it may also be used for navigation, since the Earth has a magnetic field. Since corroding metal produces weak voltages, sharks sometimes attack metal objects like boats.When not attacking submarines, the great hammerhead shark prefers foods such as sardines, herring, tarpon, jacks, grouper, sea cats, flatfish, and croaker. These large fish will also eat stingrays, skates, and even other sharks. In order to consume a ray, the great hammerhead uses its head to pin the hapless ray down, and then bites off the wings before consuming its prey. Some hammerhead sharks eat so many stingrays they develop immunity to the poison of these creatures, despite having their mouths and jaws continuously stuck with stingers.

Hammerhead sharks prefer tropical waters and the warmer of the world’s temperate waters. Many migrate to cooler waters in the summer, returning to the tropics for the winter. The sharks are found in depths up to two hundred and sixty feet, and when far from shore, are often sighted in large schools.

Like many sharks, baby hammerheads are born alive. They are viviparous, meaning that the eggs hatch within the mother and the young mature in the uterus before being born. Unlike many other sharks, female hammerheads have both a placenta and an umbilical cord and can thus nourish their young, helping to prevent the rampant cannibalism that occurs in many other shark species.

 

Attractiveness Adult:

Attractiveness Young:

Initial Happiness:

Habitat Preference:

85
95
75
70

Captivity:

Crowd:

CrowdHappiness Change:

ClimbsCliffs:

10
35
-5
No

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

To build a good animal exhibit you need to ask a few questions: (click them for the answers)

Which tank wall is suitable for this animal?     Remember that all tanks need a tank filter!

How big should the exhibit be and what Depth should the tank be?

What foliage should be used?

What rocks should be used?

What shelter does the animal need?

What toy does the animal like?

Does this animal perform in a show?

No

 

TankWallName

Purchase Cost

See Through

Height

Strength

Life

Cost Effective

Concrete Edge and Glass

$125

Yes

3

500

13

10.4

Atlantean Tank Wall

$125

Yes

3

500

13

10.4

Solid Concrete

$125

No

3

500

13

10.4

Black Bar and Glass

$130

Yes

3

500

13

10.0

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Animal Density

Min

Number of Animals/Exhibit

Max

20

2

 

4

TankDepth
4
 
28

Terrain Name

Value

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Saltwater
100
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
200

Rocks

16
13
26
38
51
64
77
90
102
115
128

Foliage

12
2
5
7
10
12
14
17
19
22
24

Exhibit Size

100
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
200

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

TreeName

Foliage Effect

Cost/ Square

Cost Effective

7417
8
Sea Grass
8
$100
8.0
7407
6
Feather Duster Worm
6
$120
5.0
7406
6
Divercate Tree Coral
6
$125
4.8
7408
6
Fire Coral
6
$150
4.0
7419
6
Stove Pipe Sponge
6
$150
4.0
7405
3
Orange Cup Coral
3
$155
1.9
7415
3
Sea Star
3
$125
2.4
7404
3
Clam Bed
3
$125
2.4
7411
3
Red Gorgonian
3
$125
2.4
7401
3
Barnacles
3
$75
4.0
7413
3
Sand Dollar
3
$110
2.7
7414
3
Sea Cucumber
3
$125
2.4

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

RockName

Size X

Size Y

Rock

Rock Effect

Purchase Cost

Cost Effective

9235
6
Small Ocean Floor Rock
1
1
Yes
24
$100
24.0
9236
6
Medium Coral Formation
4
4
Yes
6
$150
4.0
9241
6
Isle Rock
8
8
Yes
6
$150
4.0
9239
6
Large Coral Formation
4
6
Yes
6
$175
3.4
9237
6
Large Ocean Floor Rock
4
4
Yes
6
$165
3.6
9238
6
Medium Ocean Floor Rock
2
2
Yes
6
$150
4.0

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Shelter ID

Shelter Name

Shelter Value

Shelter Effect

Purchase Cost

Capacity

Requires Research
8135
Seafloor Cave
10
0
$650
4
No
8136
Sunken Ship
10
0
$800
4
No

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ToyID

ToyName

ToyValue

PurchaseCost

6466
Fake Clam
100
$185
6468
Treasure Chest
100
$185
6470
Deep Sea Diver
100
$200

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ReproductionChance:

High

SickChance:

5

ReproductionInterval(months):

9

SickChange:

-12

HappyReproduceThreshold:

98

DeathChance:

10

Offspring:

2

TimeDeath(months):

36

BabyToAdult(months):

4

 

 

SkipTrickHappiness:

 

SkipTrickChance:

 

 

SalinityChange:

-10

SalinityHealthChange:

-20

PooWaterImpact:

5

MurkyWaterThreshold:

60

MurkyWaterChange:

-5

MurkyWaterHealthChange:

-5

VeryMurkyWaterThreshold:

20

ExtremelyMurkyWaterThreshold

1

VeryMurkyWaterChange:

-10

ExtremelyMurkyWaterChange

-15

VeryMurkyWaterHealthChange:

-10

ExtremelyMurkyWaterHealthChange:

-15

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Compatible Animals

Prey Animals

Great White Shark

10

KeeperFoodType:

Chum

Shortfin Mako Shark

10

Polar Bear

Tiger Shark

10

Bengal Tiger

 

Siberian Tiger

Grizzly Bear

Hippopotamus

Emporer Penguin

California Sea Lion

Saltwater Crocodile

White Bengal Tiger

Asian Elephant

Giant Tortoise (Meiolania)

Bottlenose Dolphin

Lion's Mane Jelly

Elephant Seal

Narwhal

Harbor Porpoise

Green Moray Eel

Beluga

Southern Sea Otter

Pacific Octopus

West Indian Manatee

Pacific Walrus

Manta Ray

Green Sea Turtle

Swordfish

Bluefin Tuna

Great Barracuda

Mermaid

Man

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?