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AnimalID

Name

5332

Deinosuchus

LocationName:

North America

Origin:

Dino Digs expansion (unlocked when the Breeding T-Rex Scenario is won)

PurchaseCost:

$10,000

RequiresResearch:

No

IsClimber:

No

IsJumper:

No

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Description:

A few small objects dimple the surface of a muddy river. They could be rocks, a fallen branch perhaps. Or maybe they are the eyes and snout of a fifty-foot-long dinosaur-eating crocodile. There is no way to tell for certain, and in Deinosuchus territory a thirsty dinosaur is a nervous dinosaur.

The jaws of Deinosuchus, or "terrible crocodile," are as long as a grown man is tall. The lower jaw lacks the sort of fixed socket that humans have, and Deinosuchus can open its mouth wide enough to clamp onto the bellies or legs of all but the biggest hadrosaurs. Deinosuchus' sharp conical teeth are not designed to cut flesh or stab into vital areas, but to pin and trap their prey. After a successful shoreline ambush, Deinosuchus will drag their struggling prey to deeper water to tire and drown it before eating.

Deinosuchus originally lived at the same time as many dinosaurs but is not actually a dinosaur itself. Like modern alligators and crocodiles, Deinosuchus comes from the Crocodylidae family. Once found near rivers, swamps and inland seas from Texas to New Jersey, Deinosuchus still prefers to spend the majority of its life either in or very near the water.

Like the crocodiles of today, Deinosuchus makes an impressive variety of calls, hisses, and cough-like grunts. Starting from the day they hatch, they use these calls to convey distress, to warn or threaten, and, as they grow, to court suitable mates. All this communication does not add up to a polite society however: Deinosuchus will eat their own kind given the chance.

 

Attractiveness Adult:

Attractiveness Young:

Initial Happiness:

Habitat Preference:

150

160

50

70

Captivity:

Crowd:

CrowdHappiness Change:

ClimbsCliffs:

5

50

-5

No

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

To build a good animal exhibit you need to ask a few questions: (click them for the answers)

Which fence is suitable for this animal in terms of strength, if it can be climbed or jumped over?

How big should the exhibit be and what Terrain should be used?

What foliage should be used?

What rocks should be used?

What shelter does the animal need?

What toy does the animal like?

How deep should the exhibit be if using the "Pit Method"?

1 level

 

FenceName

Purchase Cost

Height

Strength

Life

Cost Effective

Stick Pole Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Stick Pole Window Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Chain-link Fence

$70

2

200

10

14.3

Post and Rail Fence

$90

2

250

12

13.3

Wood Slat Window Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Wooden Slat Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Rock Wall Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Rock Window Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Concrete Chain Fence

$150

2

275

14

9.3

Plexiglas Fence

$150

2

270

13

8.7

Iron Bar Fence

$180

2

290

14

7.8

Concrete Fence

$200

2

300

15

7.5

Reinforced Concrete Fence

$225

3

460

16

7.1

Reinforced Concrete and Glass Fence

$225

3

420

15

6.7

Concrete and Iron Bar Fence

$240

3

440

15

6.3

Electrified Chain-link Fence

$300

3

480

18

6.0

Electrified Iron Bar Fence

$350

3

400

18

5.1

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Animal Density

Min

Number of Animals/Exhibit

Max

230

1

 

2

Terrain Name

Value

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Salt water

70

161

322

483

644

805

966

1127

1288

1449

1610

Tank can be used in place of water requirement

Brown stone

20

46

92

138

184

230

276

322

368

414

460

Dirt

10

23

46

69

92

115

138

161

184

207

230

Rocks

2

18

37

55

74

92

110

129

147

166

184

Foliage

8

18

37

55

74

92

110

129

147

166

184

Elevation

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Exhibit Size

100

230

460

690

920

1150

1380

1610

1840

2070

2300

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

TreeName

Foliage Effect

Cost/ Square

Cost Effective

7088

 8

Horsetail 

 44

 $500

 8.8

7061

7

Water Lilly

40

$140

28.6

7083

12

Bald Cypress Tree

15

$170

8.8

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

RockName

Size X

Size Y

Rock

Rock Effect

Purchase Cost

Cost Effective

9206

3

Small Rock

1

1

Yes

12

$55

21.8

9205

3

Medium Rock 

1

1

Yes

12

$75

16.0

9200

5

Large Rock

2

2

Yes

5

$150

3.3

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Shelter ID

Shelter Name

Shelter Value

Shelter Effect

Purchase Cost

Capacity

Requires Research

 

none

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ToyID

ToyName

ToyValue

PurchaseCost

 

none

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ReproductionChance:

High

SickChance:

5

ReproductionInterval(months):

9

SickChange:

-12

HappyReproduceThreshold:

95

DeathChance:

10

Offspring:

1

TimeDeath(months):

36

BabyToAdult(months):

4

 

LaysEggs

Yes

TimeToHatch(days)

13


SalinityChange:

-10

SalinityHealthChange:

-20

PooWaterImpact:

5

MurkyWaterThreshold:

60

MurkyWaterChange:

-5

MurkyWaterHealthChange:

-5

VeryMurkyWaterThreshold:

20

ExtremelyMurkyWaterThreshold

1

VeryMurkyWaterChange:

-10

ExtremelyMurkyWaterChange

-15

VeryMurkyWaterHealthChange:

-10

ExtremelyMurkyWaterHealthChange:

-15

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Compatible Animals

Prey Animals

Saltwater Crocodile

13

KeeperFoodType:

Large meat chow

 

African Elephant

Giant Panda

Polar Bear

Chimpanzee

Plains Zebra

Thomsons Gazelle

Lion

Bengal Tiger

Siberian Tiger

Cheetah

Leopard

Black Leopard

Snow Leopard

Clouded Leopard

Jaguar

Gray Wolf

Grizzly Bear

Black Bear

Spotted Hyena

Olive Baboon

Mandrill

Lowland Gorilla

Red Kangaroo

Black Rhinocerous

Common Wildebeest

American Bison

Ibex

Okapi

Moose

African Buffalo

Gemsbok

American Bighorn Sheep

Giraffe

Dromedary Camel

Hippopotamus

Markhor

Greater Flamingo

Ostrich

Emporer Penguin

California Sea Lion

Giant Anteater

African Warthog

White Bengal Tiger

Triceratops

Arctic Wolf

Unicorn

Black Buck

Bongo

Mountain Lion

Sable Antelope

Asian Black Bear

Asian Elephant

Saber-toothed cat (Smilodon)

Ankylosaurus

Gallimimus

Iguanodon

Lambeosaurus

Spinosaurus

Styracosaurus

Velociraptor

Allosaurus

Camptosaurus

Caudipteryx

Kentrosaurus

Plesiosaurus

Reindeer

Apatosaurus

Coelophysis

Herrerasaurus

Plateosaurus

Wooly Mammoth

Wooly Rhino

Giant Tortoise (Meiolania)

Zookeeper

Maintenance worker

Tour Guide

Man

Scientist

Orca
Great White Shark
Bottlenose Dolphin
Lion's Mane Jelly
Elephant Seal
Narwhal
Harbor Porpoise
Hammerhead Shark
Tiger Shark
Shortfin Mako Shark
Green Moray Eel
Beluga
Southern Sea Otter
Pacific Octopus
West Indian Manatee
Pacific Walrus
Manta Ray
Green Sea Turtle
Swordfish
Giant Squid
Bluefin Tuna
Great Barracuda
Mermaid
Megatherium
Komodo Dragon
Macrauchenia
Orangutan
Malaysian Tapir
Japanese Serow
Przewalski's Wild Hors
Javan Rhinocerous
Bigfoot
Loch Ness Monster
Mexican Wolf
Marine Specialis

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?