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AnimalID

Name

5041

Saltwater Crocodile

LocationName:

Southeast Asia

Origin:

Original ZT

PurchaseCost:

$1,500

RequiresResearch:

No

IsClimber:

No

IsJumper:

No

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Description:

The saltwater crocodile, or "salty," is the largest living reptile in the world. In rare cases, males can reach lengths of up to 23 feet, although lengths of 13 feet are average. Females are smaller and do not normally exceed 10 feet. This crocodile has a large head, a broad, rounded snout, and a heavy set of jaws lined with cone-shaped teeth. The skin of mature adults is generally dark, with lighter tan or gray areas and cream-colored bellies.

Saltwater crocodiles are designed for an aquatic environment, possessing clear eyelids that enable them to see underwater, flaps of skin that keep water out of their throat and ears, and webbed rear feet that aid in swimming. Like all reptiles, salties are cold-blooded. After basking in the sun, they must return to the water to cool off. A saltwater crocodile will also lie with its mouth open to release excess heat.

This reptile is the direct descendent of the archosaurs, an intelligent species of dinosaur that dominated the earth during the Mesozoic Era. In addition to a large Australian population, smaller populations exist in China, the Indian sub-continent, and Southeast Asia. Individuals have been found far from their usual range, as they are able to travel long distances by sea. This seafaring ability helps to explain their wide distribution.

These crocodiles are commonly found in the brackish water around coastal areas and in tidal rivers. They can also be found in the open sea or inland in freshwater rivers, swamps, and billabongs. Movement between different habitats occurs seasonally and as a result of social status. Juveniles raised in freshwater areas are eventually forced out by dominant adults, who use these areas for breeding. If unable to establish a territory in a tidal river system, they may move out to sea, circling the coast in search of another river.

Females generally lay 40 to 60 eggs in mounded nests of mud and plant material. The mother guards the eggs for about three months. The young crocodile breaks out of its shell using a small temporary "egg tooth" on its snout. The mother digs the neonates out of the nest when they start chirping and carries them to the water in her mouth. The temperature at which the egg is kept determines the gender of its inhabitant. Eggs kept at 88.8 degrees Fahrenheit will produce male offspring. Hotter or colder temperatures will produce females. Only about one percent of the young survive to adulthood, due to predation both by other species and by territorial male crocodiles, which will kill and eat juveniles. Crocodiles that survive to adulthood may live as long as 100 years.

Mature saltwater crocodiles take a wide variety of prey, including large wading birds, buffalo, domestic livestock, wild boar, and monkeys. The salty's feeding strategy is to lie quietly near the water's edge and pounce suddenly on unwary victims. Although other crocodiles have undeserved reputations as man-eaters, the saltwater crocodile is actually quite dangerous and will even attack people in boats. This species is responsible for a number of injuries and deaths every year.

Although this species was hunted almost to extinction in the late 1960s, the future of the saltwater crocodile seems very secure today, given the large populations existing in Australia and Papua New Guinea. However, it is likely that the salty's range will be reduced through the elimination of many small populations elsewhere. Loss of human life has led to animosity towards the species, making conservation difficult.

Attractiveness Adult:

Attractiveness Young:

Initial Happiness:

Habitat Preference:

60

120

50

70

Captivity:

Crowd:

CrowdHappiness Change:

ClimbsCliffs:

5

25

-5

No

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

To build a good animal exhibit you need to ask a few questions: (click them for the answers)

Which fence is suitable for this animal in terms of strength, if it can be climbed or jumped over?

How big should the exhibit be and what Terrain should be used?

What foliage should be used?

What rocks should be used?

What shelter does the animal need?

What toy does the animal like?

How deep should the exhibit be if using the "Pit Method"?

1 level

 

FenceName

Purchase Cost

Height

Strength

Life

Cost Effective

Low Chain-link Fence

$45

1

200

10

22.2

Low Stick Pole Fence

$55

1

225

11

20.0

Stick Pole Window Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Stick Pole Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Low Post and Rail Fence

$70

1

250

11

15.7

Chain-link Fence

$70

2

200

10

14.3

Post and Rail Fence

$90

2

250

12

13.3

Low Wooden Slat Fence

$85

1

240

11

12.9

Wood Slat Window Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Wooden Slat Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Low Concrete Fence

$125

1

300

12

9.6

Low Iron Bar Fence

$125

1

290

12

9.6

Low Rock Wall Fence

$125

1

280

12

9.6

Low Concrete Chain Fence

$125

1

275

12

9.6

Low Plexiglas Fence

$125

1

270

12

9.6

Rock Window Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Rock Wall Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Concrete Chain Fence

$150

2

275

14

9.3

Plexiglas Fence

$150

2

270

13

8.7

Iron Bar Fence

$180

2

290

14

7.8

Concrete Fence

$200

2

300

15

7.5

Reinforced Concrete Fence

$225

3

460

16

7.1

Reinforced Concrete and Glass Fence

$225

3

420

15

6.7

Concrete and Iron Bar Fence

$240

3

440

15

6.3

Electrified Chain-link Fence

$300

3

480

18

6.0

Electrified Iron Bar Fence

$350

3

400

18

5.1

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Animal Density

Min

Number of Animals/Exhibit

Max

20

2

 

3

Terrain Name

Value

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Salt water

80

16

32

48

64

80

96

112

128

144

160

Tank can be used in place of water requirement

Dirt

20

4

8

12

16

20

24

28

32

36

40

Rocks

2

2

3

5

6

8

10

11

13

14

16

Foliage

8

2

3

5

6

8

10

11

13

14

16

Elevation

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Exhibit Size

100

20

40

60

80

100

120

140

160

180

200

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

TreeName

Foliage Effect

Cost/ Square

Cost Effective

7061

7

Water Lilly

40

$140

28.6

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

RockName

Size X

Size Y

Rock

Rock Effect

Purchase Cost

Cost Effective

9206

2

Small Rock

1

1

Yes

8

$55

14.5

9205

2

Medium Rock 

1

1

Yes

8

$75

10.7

9200

4

Large Rock

2

2

Yes

4

$150

2.7

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Shelter ID

Shelter Name

Shelter Value

Shelter Effect

Purchase Cost

Capacity

Requires Research

 

none

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ToyID

ToyName

ToyValue

PurchaseCost

 

none

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ReproductionChance:

High

SickChance:

5

ReproductionInterval(months):

9

SickChange:

-12

HappyReproduceThreshold:

95

DeathChance:

10

Offspring:

2

TimeDeath(months):

36

BabyToAdult(months):

4

 


SalinityChange:

-10

SalinityHealthChange:

-20

PooWaterImpact:

5

MurkyWaterThreshold:

60

MurkyWaterChange:

-5

MurkyWaterHealthChange:

-5

VeryMurkyWaterThreshold:

20

ExtremelyMurkyWaterThreshold

1

VeryMurkyWaterChange:

-10

ExtremelyMurkyWaterChange

-15

VeryMurkyWaterHealthChange:

-10

ExtremelyMurkyWaterHealthChange:

-15

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Compatible Animals

Prey Animals

None

KeeperFoodType:

Meat

 

Giant Panda

Chimpanzee

Plains Zebra

Thomsons Gazelle

Gray Wolf

Olive Baboon

Mandrill

Lowland Gorilla

Red Kangaroo

Common Wildebeest

Ibex

Okapi

Moose

Gemsbok

American Bighorn Sheep

Giraffe

Dromedary Camel

Markhor

Greater Flamingo

Ostrich

Emporer Penguin

California Sea Lion

Giant Anteater

African Warthog

Black Buck

Bongo

Sable Antelope

Man

Bottlenose Dolphin
Lion's Mane Jelly
Elephant Seal
Narwhal
Harbor Porpoise
Green Moray Eel
Beluga
Southern Sea Otter
Pacific Octopus
West Indian Manatee
Pacific Walrus
Green Sea Turtle
Swordfish
Bluefin Tuna
Great Barracuda
Orangutan
Malaysian Tapir
Japanese Serow
Przewalski's Wild Horse
Bigfoot
Mexican Wolf

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?