Make your own free website on Tripod.com

AnimalID

Name

B101B026

Yeti

LocationName:

Arctic

Origin:

Official bonus for Original ZT (classed as a User-Creation)

PurchaseCost:

$10,000

RequiresResearch:

No

IsClimber:

No

IsJumper:

Yes

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Description:

The word "yeti" is believed to have come from the Sherpa phrase "yeh-teh", meaning "rock thing." Yeti are large anthropoid creatures, covered by fur that is generally white. Their faces and chests are hairless, their heads are elongated and slightly pointed, and they have long arms. Depending on region, yeti can range from about five and a half feet to almost eight feet tall. These animals weigh anywhere from 440 to 800 pounds, with males weighing more than the females. Yeti inhabit remote mountain forest habitats, living at altitudes of up to 20,000 feet. There are small populations of yeti scattered across Asia, ranging from China, the Himalayas and on up into the former Soviet Union to Siberia.

Researchers believe that the yeti is distantly related to homo sapiens. Some speculate that the modern yeti is a direct descendant of Neanderthals who retreated into remote areas with the advent of Cro-Magnon man. Another possibility is that the yeti belongs to a different branch of the hominid tree, and is more closely related to the Gigantopithecus species. There is also some evidence indicating that the yeti may be much more closely related to the modern-day Sasquatch or "Bigfoot" of North America. It is quite possible that continuing research into the yeti and its kin will provide us with more information on our own evolutionary past.

In the wild, yeti are elusive creatures which tend to avoid contact with people. Little is known about their social habits. They often travel in small family groups, sometimes consisting merely of a mother with a single offspring. Solitary males have also been spotted. Yeti walk upright upon their four-toed feet, sometimes dragging their long arms along the ground beside them. Young yeti generally have bright red fur, which darkens as they mature. They communicate with each other through a range of whistle-like sounds. Yeti can attain speeds of up to 35 mph: twice the speed of human sprinters.

It is believed that the yeti share some characteristics with the mountain gorilla. Like the gorilla, the yeti has an undeserved reputation for fierceness. In reality, a yeti will flee from confrontation, and is believed to have a shy and gentle nature. Yeti tend to live in caves, and may build nests of vegetation for sleeping similar to those constructed by mountain gorillas. Although omnivorous in nature, the yeti is known to prey mostly upon yak and sheep, supplementing its diet with forage. Yeti are primarily nocturnal in nature, although they may also be active during part of the day.

Yeti tend to do poorly in captivity. Like the yak, the yeti's lungs are adapted to the thin air of their mountain homes, and they are prone to develop lung disease when exposed for long periods to the heavier air of lower altitudes. Despite their extreme scarcity, yeti do not make popular exhibits for zoos, as they rarely emerge from their shelters while people are watching.

Due to the inaccessibility of their natural habitat, yeti are not considered an endangered species. While some population estimates are as low as 200, others speculate that the total number of yetis in the wild may number into the thousands.

 

Attractiveness Adult:

Attractiveness Young:

Initial Happiness:

Habitat Preference:

90

270

50

80

Captivity:

Crowd:

CrowdHappiness Change:

ClimbsCliffs:

10

15

-5

Yes

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

To build a good animal exhibit you need to ask a few questions: (click them for the answers)

Which fence is suitable for this animal in terms of strength, if it can be climbed or jumped over?

How big should the exhibit be and what Terrain should be used?

What foliage should be used?

What rocks should be used?

What shelter does the animal need?

What toy does the animal like?

How deep should the exhibit be if using the "Pit Method"?

2levels

 

FenceName

Purchase Cost

Height

Strength

Life

Cost Effective

Stick Pole Window Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Stick Pole Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Chain-link Fence

$70

2

200

10

14.3

Post and Rail Fence

$90

2

250

12

13.3

Wood Slat Window Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Wooden Slat Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Rock Window Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Rock Wall Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Concrete Chain Fence

$150

2

275

14

9.3

Plexiglas Fence

$150

2

270

13

8.7

Iron Bar Fence

$180

2

290

14

7.8

Concrete Fence

$200

2

300

15

7.5

Reinforced Concrete Fence

$225

3

460

16

7.1

Reinforced Concrete and Glass Fence

$225

3

420

15

6.7

Concrete and Iron Bar Fence

$240

3

440

15

6.3

Electrified Chain-link Fence

$300

3

480

18

6.0

Electrified Iron Bar Fence

$350

3

400

18

5.1

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Animal Density

Min

Number of Animals/Exhibit

Max

85

1

 

3

Terrain Name

Value

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Snow

90

77

153

230

306

383

459

536

612

689

765

Gray stone

10

9

17

26

34

43

51

60

68

77

85

Rocks

6

20

41

61

82

102

122

143

163

184

204

Foliage

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Elevation

55

12

23

35

47

58

70

82

94

105

117

Exhibit Size

100

85

170

255

340

425

510

595

680

765

850

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

TreeName

Foliage Effect

Cost/ Square

Cost Effective

 

 

none

 

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

RockName

Size X

Size Y

Rock

Rock Effect

Purchase Cost

Cost Effective

9219

3

Small Snowy Rock

1

1

Yes

24

$75

32.0

9218

3

Medium Snowy Rock 

1

1

Yes

24

$85

28.2

9220

6

Large Snowy Rock

2

2

Yes

9

$175

5.1

9221

6

Large Snowy Rock

2

2

Yes

9

$185

4.9

9211

7

Snowy Rock Formation

8

2

 

10

$700

1.4

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Shelter ID

Shelter Name

Shelter Value

Shelter Effect

Purchase Cost

Capacity

Requires Research

8102

Snowy Rock Cave

25

15

$600

4

Yes

8109

Large Concrete Shelter

20

10

$225

6

Yes

8108

Concrete Shelter

19

9

$175

4

 

8112

Large Wood Shelter 

18

8

$325

6

Yes

8107

Small Concrete Shelter

17

7

$125

2

 

8111

Wood Shelter

16

6

$225

4

 

8110

Small Wood Shelter

13

3

$175

2

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ToyID

ToyName

ToyValue

PurchaseCost

 

None

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ReproductionChance:

Low

SickChance:

10

ReproductionInterval(months):

9

SickChange:

-10

HappyReproduceThreshold:

99

DeathChance:

10

Offspring:

1

TimeDeath(months):

47

BabyToAdult(months):

7

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Compatible Animals

Prey Animals

none

 

KeeperFoodType:

Meat

 

Giant Panda

 

Chimpanzee

 

Plains Zebra

 

Thomsons Gazelle

 

Gray Wolf

 

Olive Baboon

 

Mandrill

 

Lowland Gorilla

 

Red Kangaroo

 

Common Wildebeest

 

Ibex

 

Okapi

 

Moose

 

Gemsbok

 

American Bighorn Sheep

 

Giraffe

 

Dromedary Camel

 

Markhor

 

Greater Flamingo

 

Ostrich

 

Emporer Penguin

 

California Sea Lion

 

Giant Anteater

 

African Warthog

 

Black Buck

 

Bongo

 

Sable Antelope

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?