Make your own free website on Tripod.com

AnimalID

Name

5081

Asian Elephant

LocationName:

Southeast Asia

Origin:

Official bonus for Original ZT

PurchaseCost:

$1,500

RequiresResearch:

No

IsClimber:

No

IsJumper:

Yes

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Description:

The Asian elephant differs from its cousin, the African elephant, in several ways. Asian elephants are smaller, with males reaching up to 20 feet in length, 10 feet in height, and 12,000 lbs. in weight. They have smaller ears, more rounded backs, smoother skin, and an extra toenail on each foot. Their heads have two domes, rather than one, and only the males grow large tusks. The ends of their trunks also differ; whereas the African elephant has two projections, which it can use like fingers to grasp objects, the Asian elephant has only a single projection, requiring it to curl its trunk around anything it wants to pick up.

Asian elephants are scattered across southern Asia, from the Himalayas to Borneo. They live in all sorts of habitats, being found at widely different elevations and in climates ranging from very wet to very dry. They prefer areas that combine grass, low woody plants, and forest. At one time, elephants migrated seasonally, but agricultural development has interfered with their ability to wander freely between regions. An ideal habitat for an Asian elephant is on the fringes of a tropical rainforest, where there is an abundance of water and a plentiful supply of food. Although grasses make up a large percentage of their diet, they will also eat leaves, bark, stems and fruits. Acacia and palm trees are favorites, as are mangoes, bananas, coconuts and berries. As elephants have inefficient digestive systems, utilizing only about 50% of their food intake, they need to eat a great deal. In captivity, their exhibits tend to need a lot of cleaning!

While female African elephants have well-developed tusks, their Asian counterparts do not. This is probably due to differences between the regions in which they are found. In Africa, the elephant's tusks help it to strip bark from trees and dig for scarce water, minerals, and roots. In Asia, where food is more plentiful, tusks are not as necessary for survival.

Elephants are highly intelligent animals, with a well-developed social system. Herds consist of between 15 and 30 related individuals, generally led by an older matriarch. Males are solitary, joining the herd only for the mating season. At this time, the bull elephants will battle fiercely, and sometimes fatally, for mating rights in the herd.

Elephants communicate using a number of different sounds. An agitated or angry elephant will trumpet loudly. While feeding, elephants make a purring sound. Many sounds made by elephants are too low for the human ear to detect.

Baby elephants are born after a year and a half gestation, and are soon able to stand and follow their mothers. They may nurse from their own mother, or from other lactating females in the herd. Although able to eat grass after a few months, elephant calves will continue nursing for about 18 months. Males leave the herd when they become sexually mature, at about 14 years of age. Elephants are slow and difficult to breed, bearing only about four young during their lives. Elephants live for about 70 years.

Historically, their intelligence, strength, dexterity, and ability to navigate difficult terrain have made elephants ideal working animals. They have been used for transport and logging, and as war steeds and circus performers. Nowadays, many of their traditional roles have been phased out, leaving many of the domesticated animals without a means of support. In the wild, due to poaching and habitat destruction, Asian elephants have become an endangered species, with an estimate of fewer than 30,000 individuals remaining.

 

Attractiveness Adult:

Attractiveness Young:

Initial Happiness:

Habitat Preference:

40

125

70

80

Captivity:

Crowd:

CrowdHappiness Change:

ClimbsCliffs:

10

50

-5

No

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

To build a good animal exhibit you need to ask a few questions: (click them for the answers)

Which fence is suitable for this animal in terms of strength, if it can be climbed or jumped over?

How big should the exhibit be and what Terrain should be used?

What foliage should be used?

What rocks should be used?

What shelter does the animal need?

What toy does the animal like?

How deep should the exhibit be if using the "Pit Method"?

1 level

 

FenceName

Purchase Cost

Height

Strength

Life

Cost Effective

Stick Pole Window Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Stick Pole Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Chain-link Fence

$70

2

200

10

14.3

Post and Rail Fence

$90

2

250

12

13.3

Wood Slat Window Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Wooden Slat Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Rock Window Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Rock Wall Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Concrete Chain Fence

$150

2

275

14

9.3

Plexiglas Fence

$150

2

270

13

8.7

Iron Bar Fence

$180

2

290

14

7.8

Concrete Fence

$200

2

300

15

7.5

Reinforced Concrete Fence

$225

3

460

16

7.1

Reinforced Concrete and Glass Fence

$225

3

420

15

6.7

Concrete and Iron Bar Fence

$240

3

440

15

6.3

Electrified Chain-link Fence

$300

3

480

18

6.0

Electrified Iron Bar Fence

$350

3

400

18

5.1

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Animal Density

Min

Number of Animals/Exhibit

Max

45

2

 

12

Terrain Name

Value

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Rainforest floor

60

24

48

72

96

120

144

168

192

216

240

Fresh water

20

8

16

24

32

40

48

56

64

72

80

Tank can be used in place of water requirement

Grass

20

8

16

24

32

40

48

56

64

72

80

Rocks

2

3

6

10

13

16

19

22

26

29

32

Foliage

12

5

10

14

19

24

29

34

38

43

48

Elevation

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Exhibit Size

100

40

80

120

160

200

240

280

320

360

400

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

TreeName

Foliage Effect

Cost/ Square

Cost Effective

7018

10

Foxtail Palm Tree

52

$480

10.8

7051

3

Rainforest Fern

24

$180

13.3

7014

3

Mangrove Tree

24

$620

3.9

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

RockName

Size X

Size Y

Rock

Rock Effect

Purchase Cost

Cost Effective

9206

3

Small Rock

1

1

Yes

12

$55

21.8

9205

3

Medium Rock 

1

1

Yes

12

$75

16.0

9200

6

Large Rock

2

2

Yes

6

$150

4.0

9213

7

Waterfall Rock Formation

8

8

 

10

$1,400

0.7

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Shelter ID

Shelter Name

Shelter Value

Shelter Effect

Purchase Cost

Capacity

Requires Research

8117

Large Elephant Shelter

25

15

$800

5

Yes

8116

Small Elephant Shelter

20

10

$500

3

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ToyID

ToyName

ToyValue

PurchaseCost

 

none

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ReproductionChance:

Low

SickChance:

2

ReproductionInterval(months):

9

SickChange:

-10

HappyReproduceThreshold:

97

DeathChance:

10

Offspring:

1

TimeDeath(months):

47

BabyToAdult(months):

6

 


SalinityChange:

-10

SalinityHealthChange:

-20

PooWaterImpact:

5

MurkyWaterThreshold:

60

MurkyWaterChange:

-5

MurkyWaterHealthChange:

-5

VeryMurkyWaterThreshold:

20

ExtremelyMurkyWaterThreshold

1

VeryMurkyWaterChange:

-10

ExtremelyMurkyWaterChange

-15

VeryMurkyWaterHealthChange:

-10

ExtremelyMurkyWaterHealthChange:

-15

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Compatible Animals

Prey Animals

none

 

KeeperFoodType:

Grass and branches

 

Lion

Bengal Tiger

Siberian Tiger

Cheetah

Leopard

Black Leopard

Snow Leopard

Clouded Leopard

Jaguar

Spotted Hyena

White Bengal Tiger

Lion's Mane Jelly
Narwhal
Harbor Porpoise
Green Moray Eel
Beluga
Southern Sea Otter
Pacific Octopus
West Indian Manatee
Pacific Walrus
Green Sea Turtle
Swordfish
Bluefin Tuna
Great Barracuda
Mermaid

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?