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AnimalID

Name

5008

Siberian Tiger

LocationName:

Siberia

Origin:

Original ZT

PurchaseCost:

$1,000

RequiresResearch:

No

IsClimber:

No

IsJumper:

Yes

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Description:

Siberian tigers live in Siberia, northern China, and Manchuria. Most of them can be found in snow-covered evergreen and deciduous mountain forests, up to elevations of 3,000 feet. They prefer rocky slopes near rivers and grassy areas containing prey species.

Siberian tigers are the largest members of the tiger species, just as tigers are the largest members of the cat family. Siberian tigers differ from other tigers in the length of their coats, the brownish color and lower density of their stripes, and the fact that their coats become lighter, sometimes almost white, during the winter months. This coat is thick and shaggy, with the longer hair surrounding the male's face forming a cuff. A tiger's stripes are similar to a human thumbprint; there are no two tigers with exactly the same stripe pattern. Loose skin over the tiger's belly reduces the chance of injury from kicking prey. The tigerís eyes have round pupils and yellow irises. The night vision for these cats is six times greater than that of humans.

In general, tigers are solitary and territorial animals, requiring a large home range of between 500 to 620 square miles. In captivity, these animals need lots of space. Tigers only come together with other tigers during the spring mating season.

Mother tigers will generally associate only with their young. Tigers reproduce well in captivity.

Humans are the only enemy of the Siberian tiger, which has become endangered through hunting and the destruction of its habitat. Today, there may be as many Siberian tigers in captivity as there are free. It is estimated that there are only between 150 and 430 Siberian tigers still living in the wild.

Tigers have no relationship with other animals, except as a source of food. A Siberian tiger will eat just about anything it can catch, including wild boar, deer, elk, lynx, bears, badgers, and hares. It will also catch salmon and other fish. Usually, only one out of ten hunting trips is successful. To sustain itself in its cold habitat, this animal needs to eat over 20 pounds of meat a day. It is capable of eating 70 pounds of meat in a single night. In captivity, Siberian tigers eat a steady diet of enriched horsemeat, bones, and dry foods. Tigers become quite upset (and loud) when they do not receive an adequate supply of food.

Tigers depend on their sight and hearing more than on their sense of smell to locate prey. They hunt at night, stalking slowly and stealthily through dense cover until they are close enough to spring. They kill their prey by using their canines to bite the throat or neck. Siberian tigers will then hide their kill, and are capable of dragging a weight that a dozen men would have difficulty moving.

Tigers are excellent swimmers. They will often escape the heat of the day by lying in pools of water. They may also rest in long grass or rocky caves. Although these tigers do not have the stamina for long, swift runs, they are capable of covering huge distances. One Siberian tiger traveled 620 miles in 22 days in search of food.

Tigers have a variety of calls ranging from a whoof to a full-throated roar. A tiger roar can be heard over a mile away. In captivity, when tigers are distressed, they will roar and race around their exhibit.

Attractiveness Adult:

Attractiveness Young:

Initial Happiness:

Habitat Preference:

30

90

90

70

Captivity:

Crowd:

CrowdHappiness Change:

ClimbsCliffs:

2

30

-5

Yes

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

To build a good animal exhibit you need to ask a few questions: (click them for the answers)

Which fence is suitable for this animal in terms of strength, if it can be climbed or jumped over?

How big should the exhibit be and what Terrain should be used?

What foliage should be used?

What rocks should be used?

What shelter does the animal need?

What toy does the animal like?

How deep should the exhibit be if using the "Pit Method"?

2 levels

 

FenceName

Purchase Cost

Height

Strength

Life

Cost Effective

Stick Pole Window Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Stick Pole Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Chain-link Fence

$70

2

200

10

14.3

Post and Rail Fence

$90

2

250

12

13.3

Wood Slat Window Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Wooden Slat Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Rock Window Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Rock Wall Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Concrete Chain Fence

$150

2

275

14

9.3

Plexiglas Fence

$150

2

270

13

8.7

Iron Bar Fence

$180

2

290

14

7.8

Concrete Fence

$200

2

300

15

7.5

Reinforced Concrete Fence

$225

3

460

16

7.1

Reinforced Concrete and Glass Fence

$225

3

420

15

6.7

Concrete and Iron Bar Fence

$240

3

440

15

6.3

Electrified Chain-link Fence

$300

3

480

18

6.0

Electrified Iron Bar Fence

$350

3

400

18

5.1

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Animal Density

Min

Number of Animals/Exhibit

Max

35

2

 

3

Terrain Name

Value

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Coniferous floor

40

14

28

42

56

70

84

98

112

126

140

Snow

40

14

28

42

56

70

84

98

112

126

140

Gray stone

15

5

11

16

21

26

32

37

42

47

53

Fresh water

5

2

4

5

7

9

11

12

14

16

18

Tank can be used in place of water requirement

Rocks

2

3

6

8

11

14

17

20

22

25

28

Foliage

12

4

8

13

17

21

25

29

34

38

42

Elevation

15

1

3

4

5

7

8

9

11

12

13

Exhibit Size

100

35

70

105

140

175

210

245

280

315

350

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

TreeName

Foliage Effect

Cost/ Square

Cost Effective

7069

10

Chinese Fir Tree

52

$500

10.4

7075

7

Pine Bush

40

$340

11.8

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

RockName

Size X

Size Y

Rock

Rock Effect

Purchase Cost

Cost Effective

9206

2

Small Rock

1

1

Yes

8

$55

14.5

9205

Medium Rock 

Yes 

 $75

 10.7

9225

4

Coniferous Forest Rock

6

4

Yes

7

$310

2.3

9200

4

Large Rock

2

2

Yes

4

$150

2.7

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Shelter ID

Shelter Name

Shelter Value

Shelter Effect

Purchase Cost

Capacity

Requires Research

8100

Rock Cave

25

15

$500

4

Yes

8112

Large Wood Shelter 

18

8

$325

6

Yes

8109

Large Concrete Shelter

18

8

$225

6

Yes

8111

Wood Shelter

16

6

$225

4

 

8108

Concrete Shelter

16

6

$175

4

 

8107

Small Concrete Shelter

13

3

$125

2

 

8110

Small Wood Shelter

13

3

$175

2

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ToyID

ToyName

ToyValue

PurchaseCost

 

none

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ReproductionChance:

High

SickChance:

10

ReproductionInterval(months):

5

SickChange:

-20

HappyReproduceThreshold:

95

DeathChance:

10

Offspring:

2

TimeDeath(months):

47

BabyToAdult(months):

4

 


SalinityChange:

-10

SalinityHealthChange:

-20

PooWaterImpact:

5

MurkyWaterThreshold:

60

MurkyWaterChange:

-5

MurkyWaterHealthChange:

-5

VeryMurkyWaterThreshold:

20

ExtremelyMurkyWaterThreshold

1

VeryMurkyWaterChange:

-10

ExtremelyMurkyWaterChange

-15

VeryMurkyWaterHealthChange:

-10

ExtremelyMurkyWaterHealthChange:

-15

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Compatible Animals

Prey Animals

None

KeeperFoodType:

Meat

 

Giant Panda

Chimpanzee

Plains Zebra

Thomsons Gazelle

Gray Wolf

Olive Baboon

Mandrill

Lowland Gorilla

Red Kangaroo

Common Wildebeest

Ibex

Okapi

Moose

Gemsbok

American Bighorn Sheep

Giraffe

Dromedary Camel

Markhor

Greater Flamingo

Ostrich

Emporer Penguin

California Sea Lion

Giant Anteater

African Warthog

Black Buck

Bongo

Sable Antelope

Man

Bottlenose Dolphin
Lion's Mane Jelly
Elephant Seal
Harbor Porpoise
Green Moray Eel
Southern Sea Otter
Pacific Octopus
West Indian Manatee
Pacific Walrus
Green Sea Turtle
Swordfish
Bluefin Tuna
Great Barracuda
Orangutan
Malaysian Tapir
Japanese Serow
Przewalski's Wild Horse
Bigfoot
Mexican Wolf

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?