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AnimalID

Name

5023

Red Kangaroo

LocationName:

Australia

Origin:

Original ZT

PurchaseCost:

$600

RequiresResearch:

No

IsClimber:

No

IsJumper:

Yes

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Description:

Red kangaroos are the world's largest marsupials. Despite the name, not all red kangaroos are red. In the eastern part of their range, males are usually some shade of red and females are blue-gray; elsewhere, both sexes may be reddish brown. Male kangaroos are called "boomers," female kangaroos are "blue fliers," and young are called "joeys." Red kangaroos are found primarily in the dry grasslands and plains of central Australia. The terrain in this region consists of savannah-like grasses interspersed with barren areas of dry dirt, sand, and the occasional rock. Kangaroos prefer open areas, with a sparse scattering of native bushes and trees for shade. Kangaroos are semi-nomadic, and their movements are not restricted by most types of fencing.

These animals congregate in loose and temporary social groupings, called mobs. Although the makeup of a mob can vary, it will commonly contain a dominant male, several adult females, and young of both sexes. Mothers and young can remain together for years.

Kangaroos are able to survive high temperatures by seeking shade during the day and feeding at night. In the wild, their diet consists of green grass, leaves, and roots. They swallow their food whole, later regurgitating a cud and chewing it. In the wild, this animal does not need continual access to fresh water, as long as green herbage is available. When necessary, they will dig for water. In zoos, kangaroos are fed a diet that typically includes fruit, yams, bread, monkey-dog-guinea pig chow, and vitamin supplements.

Baby kangaroos are bean-sized when born. The tiny, hairless embryo makes its way across the mother's belly into the pouch, where it attaches itself to one of the four available teats. Once nursing begins, the teat swells up so that the baby will remain attached. The joey will remain in the pouch for 5 to 6 months as it continues to mature. After that, it will be fully developed and can emerge to explore. Joeys are usually weaned around one year of age, but will remain close to the mother for another six months.

Kangaroos are so well-designed for hopping that they are unable to walk. They have large, powerful hind feet that cannot move independently of each other and a tendon in their legs that behaves like a rubber band, conserving energy as they move. Red kangaroos can hop as fast as 40 mph, making leaps as long as 29 feet. Kangaroos will run from danger, rather than fight, although a large claw attached to their hind leg makes them quite dangerous at close quarters. The kangaroo's long, heavy tail provides balance and support.

Red kangaroos are shy, alert creatures, docile except when cornered. To warn their mob of impending danger, these animals will thump on the ground. Hearing this warning, joeys will jump back into their mothers' pouches. Although males will not defend the members of their mob from attack, they will fight each other for breeding rights. The two boomers will attempt to push each other off balance by jabbing or locking forearms. Sometimes they will lean back on their tails and kick each other in the belly with their powerful hind feet.

Foxes and eagles prey on very young kangaroos. Dingoes prey on young and adult alike. Because of the damage they can do to crops, kangaroos are considered pests and are destroyed accordingly. Red kangaroos are also commercially hunted for skins and meat. This animal is considered a threatened species.

Attractiveness Adult:

Attractiveness Young:

Initial Happiness:

Habitat Preference:

35

105

70

60

Captivity:

Crowd:

CrowdHappiness Change:

ClimbsCliffs:

8

20

-5

No

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

To build a good animal exhibit you need to ask a few questions: (click them for the answers)

Which fence is suitable for this animal in terms of strength, if it can be climbed or jumped over?

How big should the exhibit be and what Terrain should be used?

What foliage should be used?

What rocks should be used?

What shelter does the animal need?

What toy does the animal like?

How deep should the exhibit be if using the "Pit Method"?

1level

 

FenceName

Purchase Cost

Height

Strength

Life

Cost Effective

Stick Pole Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Stick Pole Window Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Chain-link Fence

$70

2

200

10

14.3

Post and Rail Fence

$90

2

250

12

13.3

Wood Slat Window Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Wooden Slat Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Rock Wall Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Rock Window Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Concrete Chain Fence

$150

2

275

14

9.3

Plexiglas Fence

$150

2

270

13

8.7

Iron Bar Fence

$180

2

290

14

7.8

Concrete Fence

$200

2

300

15

7.5

Reinforced Concrete Fence

$225

3

460

16

7.1

Reinforced Concrete and Glass Fence

$225

3

420

15

6.7

Concrete and Iron Bar Fence

$240

3

440

15

6.3

Electrified Chain-link Fence

$300

3

480

18

6.0

Electrified Iron Bar Fence

$350

3

400

18

5.1

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Animal Density

Min

Number of Animals/Exhibit

Max

20

1

 

3

Terrain Name

Value

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Savannah grass

60

12

24

36

48

60

72

84

96

108

120

Dirt

30

6

12

18

24

30

36

42

48

54

60

Sand

8

2

3

5

6

8

10

11

13

14

16

Fresh water

2

0

1

1

2

2

2

3

3

4

4

Rocks

2

2

3

5

6

8

10

11

13

14

16

Foliage

4

1

2

2

3

4

5

6

6

7

8

Elevation

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Exhibit Size

100

20

40

60

80

100

120

140

160

180

200

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

TreeName

Foliage Effect

Cost/ Square

Cost Effective

7017

7

Eucalyptus Tree

40

$900

4.4

7030

2

Red Gum Tree

20

$700

2.9

7063

2

Grass Tree

20

$500

4.0

7019

10

Hard Quandong Tree

13

$200

6.5

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

RockName

Size X

Size Y

Rock

Rock Effect

Purchase Cost

Cost Effective

9206

2

Small Rock

1

1

Yes

8

$55

14.5

9205

2

Medium Rock 

1

1

Yes

8

$75

10.7

9200

4

Large Rock

2

2

Yes

4

$150

2.7

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Shelter ID

Shelter Name

Shelter Value

Shelter Effect

Purchase Cost

Capacity

Requires Research

8106

Large Lean-to

24

14

$650

6

Yes

8105

Lean-to

20

10

$450

4

 

8109

Large Concrete Shelter

18

8

$225

6

Yes

8112

Large Wood Shelter 

18

8

$325

6

Yes

8108

Concrete Shelter

16

6

$175

4

 

8111

Wood Shelter

16

6

$225

4

 

8104

Small Lean-to

15

5

$250

2

 

8107

Small Concrete Shelter

13

3

$125

2

 

8110

Small Wood Shelter

13

3

$175

2

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ToyID

ToyName

ToyValue

PurchaseCost

 

none

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ReproductionChance:

High

SickChance:

5

ReproductionInterval(months):

9

SickChange:

-12

HappyReproduceThreshold:

97

DeathChance:

30

Offspring:

1

TimeDeath(months):

24

BabyToAdult(months):

5

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Compatible Animals

Prey Animals

None

KeeperFoodType:

Hay

 

none

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?