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AnimalID

Name

5016

Grizzly Bear

LocationName:

North America

Origin:

Original ZT

PurchaseCost:

$1,000

RequiresResearch:

No

IsClimber:

No

IsJumper:

Yes

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Description:

The mighty grizzly bear evolved about one million years ago, probably from the black bear family. Grizzlies, or brown bears, are one of the largest North American mammals. In some areas, male grizzlies can reach weights of up to 1,800 pounds, but those found in the lower 48 states do not generally weigh more than 600 pounds. The grizzly has a hump of muscle on its shoulders and thick, shaggy fur that is sometimes tipped with silver ends. This fur can be a variety of colors: black, cinnamon, red, or blond. The grizzly is not a climber. Instead, their claws are well adapted to digging for food, such as roots and rodents.

Grizzly bears have the most widespread distribution of any of the eight bear species. They are found in North America and scattered across Eurasia. Although they once roamed over most of the western United States, they now live only in parts of Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, and Washington. Larger populations exist in the Canadian Rockies and Alaska. The coniferous forests of the former USSR are believed to hold a large percentage of the world's remaining brown bears. It is estimated that there are currently somewhere between 125,000 and 150,000 brown bears throughout the world. Grizzlies can be found in mountain forests, open meadows, and river valleys.

Although grizzlies will, for the most part, avoid contact with humans, they are the most aggressive of all the bears and should be given plenty of room. They move with a slow shambling walk, with their heads swinging from side to side. However, they are capable of moving at speeds of up to 35 miles per hour, and even horses find it difficult to evade a rushing grizzly. Grizzlies generally remain on all fours, except when standing to survey their surroundings. These bears are primarily active at night.

During the summer and fall, grizzlies will eat 80 to 90 pounds of food a day, putting on up to 400 pounds of fat to last them through their winter's sleep. These bears are primarily vegetarians, with more than 75 percent of their diet consisting of wild fruits, berries, herbs, roots, nuts, flowers, grasses, mushrooms, and other vegetation. Grizzlies also eat honey and consume large numbers of insects. Most of the meat in the grizzly's diet comes from carrion, although it will sometimes catch live prey, such as moose calves or smaller animals. In some areas of Canada and Alaska, salmon is an important food source.

Except for mating and caring for the young, grizzly bears lead fairly solitary lives, although they will gather along streams with other grizzlies when salmon are spawning. Like polar and black bears, grizzlies mate early in the summer, and the embryos do not implant until the female is ready to begin her winter hibernation. Mother grizzlies give birth while asleep, and the tiny newborns will begin nursing on their own. By spring, when the mother is ready to leave the den, the cubs will weigh around 20 pounds. A grizzly may give birth to between one and three cubs, usually two. Cubs stay with their mother for about a year and then ease into independence.

The adult grizzly has no enemies or predators, although cubs may fall prey to mountain lions, wolves, and other bears if they stray too far from their mother. In the United States, grizzlies are listed as threatened by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. There are probably fewer than 1,000 grizzlies left in the lower 48 states. Threats to the grizzly include habitat destruction, poaching, and the elimination of individuals that have become dangerous in populated areas and campgrounds

Attractiveness Adult:

Attractiveness Young:

Initial Happiness:

Habitat Preference:

35

105

60

70

Captivity:

Crowd:

CrowdHappiness Change:

ClimbsCliffs:

10

20

-5

Yes

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

To build a good animal exhibit you need to ask a few questions: (click them for the answers)

Which fence is suitable for this animal in terms of strength, if it can be climbed or jumped over?

How big should the exhibit be and what Terrain should be used?

What foliage should be used?

What rocks should be used?

What shelter does the animal need?

What toy does the animal like?

How deep should the exhibit be if using the "Pit Method"?

2 level

 

FenceName

Purchase Cost

Height

Strength

Life

Cost Effective

Stick Pole Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Stick Pole Window Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Chain-link Fence

$70

2

200

10

14.3

Post and Rail Fence

$90

2

250

12

13.3

Wood Slat Window Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Wooden Slat Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Rock Wall Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Rock Window Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Concrete Chain Fence

$150

2

275

14

9.3

Plexiglas Fence

$150

2

270

13

8.7

Iron Bar Fence

$180

2

290

14

7.8

Concrete Fence

$200

2

300

15

7.5

Reinforced Concrete Fence

$225

3

460

16

7.1

Reinforced Concrete and Glass Fence

$225

3

420

15

6.7

Concrete and Iron Bar Fence

$240

3

440

15

6.3

Electrified Chain-link Fence

$300

3

480

18

6.0

Electrified Iron Bar Fence

$350

3

400

18

5.1

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Animal Density

Min

Number of Animals/Exhibit

Max

50

1

 

3

Terrain Name

Value

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Coniferous floor

60

30

60

90

120

150

180

210

240

270

300

Deciduous floor

30

15

30

45

60

75

90

105

120

135

150

Fresh water

10

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

50

Tank can be used in place of water requirement

Rocks

7

14

28

42

56

70

84

98

112

126

140

Foliage

20

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

Elevation

20

3

5

8

10

13

15

18

20

23

25

Exhibit Size

100

50

100

150

200

250

300

350

400

450

500

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

TreeName

Foliage Effect

Cost/ Square

Cost Effective

7024

7

Yellow Cedar Tree

40

$580

6.9

7068

2

Western Red Cedar Tree

20

$660

3.0

7023

2

Spruce Tree

20

$580

3.4

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

RockName

Size X

Size Y

Rock

Rock Effect

Purchase Cost

Cost Effective

9206

3

Small Rock

1

1

Yes

12

$55

21.8

9205

3

Medium Rock 

1

1

Yes

12

$75

16.0

9225

6

Coniferous Forest Rock

6

4

Yes

9

$310

2.9

9200

6

Large Rock

2

2

Yes

6

$150

4.0

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Shelter ID

Shelter Name

Shelter Value

Shelter Effect

Purchase Cost

Capacity

Requires Research

8100

Rock Cave

25

15

$500

4

Yes

8112

Large Wood Shelter 

20

10

$325

6

Yes

8109

Large Concrete Shelter

20

10

$225

6

Yes

8111

Wood Shelter

18

8

$225

4

 

8108

Concrete Shelter

18

8

$175

4

 

8107

Small Concrete Shelter

15

5

$125

2

 

8110

Small Wood Shelter

15

5

$175

2

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ToyID

ToyName

ToyValue

PurchaseCost

 

 none

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ReproductionChance:

Low

SickChance:

10

ReproductionInterval(months):

5

SickChange:

-10

HappyReproduceThreshold:

95

DeathChance:

30

Offspring:

2

TimeDeath(months):

47

BabyToAdult(months):

5

 


SalinityChange:

-10

SalinityHealthChange:

-20

PooWaterImpact:

5

MurkyWaterThreshold:

60

MurkyWaterChange:

-5

MurkyWaterHealthChange:

-5

VeryMurkyWaterThreshold:

20

ExtremelyMurkyWaterThreshold

1

VeryMurkyWaterChange:

-10

ExtremelyMurkyWaterChange

-15

VeryMurkyWaterHealthChange:

-10

ExtremelyMurkyWaterHealthChange:

-15

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Compatible Animals

Prey Animals

none

KeeperFoodType:

Fish

 

Giant Panda

Chimpanzee

Plains Zebra

Thomsons Gazelle

Gray Wolf

Olive Baboon

Mandrill

Lowland Gorilla

Red Kangaroo

Common Wildebeest

Ibex

Okapi

Moose

Gemsbok

American Bighorn Sheep

Giraffe

Dromedary Camel

Markhor

Greater Flamingo

Ostrich

Emporer Penguin

California Sea Lion

Giant Anteater

African Warthog

Black Buck

Bongo

Sable Antelope

Man

Bottlenose Dolphin
Lion's Mane Jelly
Elephant Seal
Harbor Porpoise
Green Moray Eel
Southern Sea Otter
Pacific Octopus
West Indian Manatee
Pacific Walrus
Green Sea Turtle
Swordfish
Bluefin Tuna
Great Barracuda
Orangutan
Malaysian Tapir
Japanese Serow
Przewalski's Wild Horse
Bigfoot
Mexican Wolf

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?