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AnimalID

Name

5039

Emperor Penguin

LocationName:

Antarctica

Origin:

Original ZT

PurchaseCost:

$1,100

RequiresResearch:

No

IsClimber:

No

IsJumper:

No

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Description:

Emperor penguins are the largest species of penguin, standing 3.7 feet tall and weighing 60 to 90 pounds. As birds that spend most of their lives at sea, penguins have traded flight for the ability to swim underwater. Emperor penguins swim at speeds ranging from five to almost nine miles per hour. They are terrific divers; dives of up to 1,700 feet in depth and 18 minutes in length have been recorded.

Emperor penguins are found exclusively in Antarctica within the pack-ice region. These birds can survive temperatures of 40 degrees Celsius. They avoid the open water beyond the limits of the floating ice and can be found near nutrient-rich, cold-water currents, which provide an abundant supply of food. In general, penguins live on a diet of small fish and crustaceans; however, emperor penguins have been known to take larger fish and even squid.

Penguins are among the most social of all birds. Penguin colonies, or rookeries, may contain thousands of individuals. They will use rocks for diving and for congregating. Emperor penguins swim, feed, and dive together, even at sea. The group offers its members protection against hunger and cold. If a penguin is too warm, it holds its flippers away from its body, so both surfaces of the flippers are exposed to air, releasing heat.

When penguins are hungry, they will often start walking together in large groups. People enjoy watching the comical gait and head movements of penguins, as they awkwardly waddle about on land on their paddle-like feet. For emperor penguins, a more efficient way to travel over the snow is to "toboggan" on their stomachs, using their flippers and feet for propulsion. In the water, these birds are adept swimmers and divers. Like dolphins, penguins leap out of the water every few feet in order to breathe.

Emperor penguins have little or no sense of smell and their sense of taste is also limited. It is thought that they may be nearsighted on land, but see better when they are underwater. They are able to withstand extremely cold temperatures because their thick layer of overlapping, oil-coated feathers forms a waterproof coat that provides excellent insulation. Their survival depends upon keeping these feathers properly maintained. These birds will preen for several minutes in the water by rubbing their bodies with their flippers while twisting and turning over.

Emperor penguins communicate with calls and through a range of ritual displays, such as head and flipper waving, bowing, gesturing, and preening. Aggressive postures like stares, pointing, and charging can occur in disputes over territory. A simple threat call is used to warn against predators.

Emperor penguins have no predators on land and so are fairly fearless around humans. In water, their black and white coloring makes them nearly invisible to predators from both above and below. The chief predator for adult penguins is the leopard seal. The giant petrel accounts for about a third of emperor chick mortality.

Female emperor penguins lay their eggs, and then head out to sea to feed for up to 60 days. During this period, the male stands awaiting her return, with the egg, covered by a loose piece of skin called the brood flap, balanced on his feet. During this incubation period, the father penguin can lose up to half his body weight.

Attractiveness Adult:

Attractiveness Young:

Initial Happiness:

Habitat Preference:

15

45

50

70

Captivity:

Crowd:

CrowdHappiness Change:

ClimbsCliffs:

5

30

-5

No

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

To build a good animal exhibit you need to ask a few questions: (click them for the answers)

Which fence is suitable for this animal in terms of strength, if it can be climbed or jumped over?

How big should the exhibit be and what Terrain should be used?

What foliage should be used?

What rocks should be used?

What shelter does the animal need?

What toy does the animal like?

How deep should the exhibit be if using the "Pit Method"?

1 level

 

FenceName

Purchase Cost

Height

Strength

Life

Cost Effective

Low Chain-link Fence

$45

1

200

10

22.2

Low Stick Pole Fence

$55

1

225

11

20.0

Stick Pole Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Stick Pole Window Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Low Post and Rail Fence

$70

1

250

11

15.7

Chain-link Fence

$70

2

200

10

14.3

Post and Rail Fence

$90

2

250

12

13.3

Low Wooden Slat Fence

$85

1

240

11

12.9

Wood Slat Window Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Wooden Slat Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Low Concrete Fence

$125

1

300

12

9.6

Low Iron Bar Fence

$125

1

290

12

9.6

Low Rock Wall Fence

$125

1

280

12

9.6

Low Concrete Chain Fence

$125

1

275

12

9.6

Low Plexiglas Fence

$125

1

270

12

9.6

Rock Wall Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Rock Window Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Concrete Chain Fence

$150

2

275

14

9.3

Plexiglas Fence

$150

2

270

13

8.7

Iron Bar Fence

$180

2

290

14

7.8

Concrete Fence

$200

2

300

15

7.5

Reinforced Concrete Fence

$225

3

460

16

7.1

Reinforced Concrete and Glass Fence

$225

3

420

15

6.7

Concrete and Iron Bar Fence

$240

3

440

15

6.3

Electrified Chain-link Fence

$300

3

480

18

6.0

Electrified Iron Bar Fence

$350

3

400

18

5.1

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Animal Density

Min

Number of Animals/Exhibit

Max

15

2

 

16

Terrain Name

Value

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Salt water

60

9

18

27

36

45

54

63

72

81

90

Tank can be used in place of water requirement

Snow

40

6

12

18

24

30

36

42

48

54

60

Rocks

6

4

7

11

14

18

22

25

29

32

36

Foliage

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Elevation

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Exhibit Size
100
15
30
45
60
75
90
105
120
135
150

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

TreeName

Foliage Effect

Cost/ Square

Cost Effective

 

 

none

 

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

RockName

Size X

Size Y

Rock

Rock Effect

Purchase Cost

Cost Effective

9219

3

Small Snowy Rock

1

1

Yes

24

$75

32.0

9218

3

Medium Snowy Rock 

1

1

Yes

24

$85

28.2

9220

6

Large Snowy Rock

2

2

Yes

9

$175

5.1

9221

6

Large Snowy Rock

2

2

Yes

9

$185

4.9

9211

7

Snowy Rock Formation

8

2

 

10

$700

1.4

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Shelter ID

Shelter Name

Shelter Value

Shelter Effect

Purchase Cost

Capacity

Requires Research

8102

Snowy Rock Cave

22

12

$600

4

Yes

8109

Large Concrete Shelter

20

10

$225

6

Yes

8108

Concrete Shelter

19

9

$175

4

 

8112

Large Wood Shelter 

18

8

$325

6

Yes

8107

Small Concrete Shelter

17

7

$125

2

 

8111

Wood Shelter

16

6

$225

4

 

8110

Small Wood Shelter

13

3

$175

2

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ToyID

ToyName

ToyValue

PurchaseCost

 

 none

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ReproductionChance:

High

SickChance:

5

ReproductionInterval(months):

5

SickChange:

-10

HappyReproduceThreshold:

90

DeathChance:

20

Offspring:

1

TimeDeath(months):

12

BabyToAdult(months):

3

 


SalinityChange:

-10

SalinityHealthChange:

-20

PooWaterImpact:

5

MurkyWaterThreshold:

60

MurkyWaterChange:

-5

MurkyWaterHealthChange:

-5

VeryMurkyWaterThreshold:

20

ExtremelyMurkyWaterThreshold

1

VeryMurkyWaterChange:

-10

ExtremelyMurkyWaterChange

-15

VeryMurkyWaterHealthChange:

-10

ExtremelyMurkyWaterHealthChange:

-15

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Compatible Animals

Prey Animals

  none

KeeperFoodType:

Fish

 

Giant Panda

Chimpanzee

Plains Zebra

Thomsons Gazelle

Olive Baboon

Mandrill

Lowland Gorilla

Red Kangaroo

Black Rhinocerous

Common Wildebeest

American Bison

Ibex

Okapi

Moose

African Buffalo

Gemsbok

American Bighorn Sheep

Giraffe

Dromedary Camel

Hippopotamus

Markhor

Greater Flamingo

Ostrich

Saltwater Crocodile

Giant Anteater

African Warthog

Orangutan
Malaysian Tapir
Japanese Serow
Przewalski's Wild Horse
Javan Rhinocerous
Bigfoot
Loch Ness Monster
Mexican Wolf

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?