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AnimalID

Name

5419

Green Sea Turtle

LocationName:

Tropical Oceans Worldwide

Origin:

Marine Mania expansion

PurchaseCost:

$600

RequiresResearch:

No

IsClimber:

No

IsJumper:

No

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Description:

The green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) doesnít actually have green skin. The green fat deposits beneath the skin give this turtle its name. These turtles travel the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans, primarily in the tropics, using sunlight to help them navigate. They travel to coastal areas to feed and to sandy beaches to lay eggs, sometimes migrating more than 500 miles.

The shell of the green sea turtle is colored on top to look like the ocean floor and underneath to look like the sky. This camouflages it against predators from above and below. External scent glands form another defense against predators--the unpleasant scent created by these glands both deters predators and fends off other turtles during the mating season. These three-foot long, four-hundred pound animals have very few ways to fight off a predator. Their paddle-like forelimbs each end in a claw, but these are used primarily for digging rather than fighting.

Up to a quarter of the green sea turtle population are killed by natural predators each year, not counting those killed by humans. The high mortality rate means that Green Sea Turtles must breed in large numbers to ensure the survival of the species. Females mature at 19 to 20 years of age and mate about every three years thereafter. During mating years, a female Green Sea Turtle can lay over 1,000 eggs in five to six clutches. But very few of these eggs will survive to maturity. When a female has mated and is ready to lay eggs, she will travel to a beach site to nest, usually the same one she selected for her last clutch of eggs. Each female leaves the water, chooses a nesting site, and then digs a pit for the eggs. Once the nest is ready the turtle will immediately begin laying eggs. A female can lay up to three eggs every second. This process can last as long as 20 minutes, but usually takes less time. At this point, the nest may contain over 200 eggs. Once her eggs are laid, the female hides the nest with sand before returning to the water. From this point on, her offspring are on their own.

Before the eggs hatch, nests are vulnerable to predators, including maggots, ants, vultures, raccoons, skunks, and humans. Thirty to 90 days after they are laid, the surviving eggs will hatch. Once all the eggs have hatched, the young turtles will wait for nightfall, dig their way out of the nest, and head for the water. The darkness canít protect them from the many hungry predators awaiting them. Hatchlings racing for the water often fall prey to gulls, rats, herons, feral cats and dogs, and opossums. In the water, the young risk being eaten by large fish, sharks, and dolphins.

Like all reptiles, sea turtles are cold blooded. To maintain their body temperature, these animals may leave the water to bask on coral and sand beaches, exposed ledges, and rocks. When no basking place is convenient, turtles will float at the water surface, exposing their carapaces to the sun. Staying warm is very important because sea turtles can be stunned by cold when water drops below 50 degrees Fahrenheit. Cold-stunned turtles can die if they do not warm themselves quickly.

Hatchling green sea turtles are omnivorous, but they become mainly herbivores once they reach a weight of about 10 pounds. These juveniles eat plankton and fish eggs while they mature. Adults prefer sea grasses and algae but still occasionally consume animals such as sponges, jellyfish, worms, snails, bivalves, squid, crabs, fish and eggs. Whether eating vegetarian or not, green sea turtles prefer to feed in shallow water, entering the deeps only to travel.

 

Attractiveness Adult:

Attractiveness Young:

Initial Happiness:

Habitat Preference:

60
70
75
70

Captivity:

Crowd:

CrowdHappiness Change:

ClimbsCliffs:

5
40
-5
No

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

To build a good animal exhibit you need to ask a few questions: (click them for the answers)

Which tank wall is suitable for this animal?     Remember that all tanks need a tank filter!

How big should the exhibit be and what Depth should the tank be?

What foliage should be used?

What rocks should be used?

What shelter does the animal need?

What toy does the animal like?

Does this animal perform in a show?

No

 

TankWallName

Purchase Cost

See Through

Height

Strength

Life

Cost Effective

Concrete Edge and Glass

$125

Yes

3

500

13

10.4

Atlantean Tank Wall

$125

Yes

3

500

13

10.4

Solid Concrete

$125

No

3

500

13

10.4

Black Bar and Glass

$130

Yes

3

500

13

10.0

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Animal Density

Min

Number of Animals/Exhibit

Max

40

2

 

3

TankDepth
2
 
28

Terrain Name

Value

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Saltwater
100
40
80
120
160
200
240
280
320
360
400

Rocks

7
11
22
34
45
56
67
78
90
101
112

Foliage

26
10
21
31
42
52
62
73
83
94
104

Exhibit Size

100
40
80
120
160
200
240
280
320
360
400

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

TreeName

Foliage Effect

Cost/ Square

Cost Effective

7408
9
Fire Coral
9
$150
6.0
7412
8
Sargassum
8
$150
5.3
7419
6
Stove Pipe Sponge
6
$150
4.0
7406
6
Divercate Tree Coral
6
$125
4.8
7417
6
Sea Grass
6
$100
6.0
7407
6
Feather Duster Worm
6
$120
5.0
7409
3
Kelp
3
$125
2.4
7414
3
Sea Cucumber
3
$125
2.4
7413
3
Sand Dollar
3
$110
2.7
7404
3
Clam Bed
3
$125
2.4
7410
3
Sea Lettuce
3
$110
2.7
7411
3
Red Gorgonian
3
$125
2.4

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

RockName

Size X

Size Y

Rock

Rock Effect

Purchase Cost

Cost Effective

9235
6
Small Ocean Floor Rock
1
1
Yes
24
$100
24.0
9206
3
Small Rock
1
1
Yes
12
$55
21.8
9205
3
Medium Rock
1
1
Yes
12
$75
16.0
9200
7
Large Rock
2
2
Yes
7
$150
4.7
9238
6
Medium Ocean Floor Rock
2
2
Yes
6
$150
4.0
9239
6
Large Coral Formation
4
6
Yes
6
$175
3.4
9237
6
Large Ocean Floor Rock
4
4
Yes
6
$165
3.6
9236
6
Medium Coral Formation
4
4
Yes
6
$150
4.0
9241
6
Isle Rock
8
8
Yes
6
$150
4.0

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Shelter ID

Shelter Name

Shelter Value

Shelter Effect

Purchase Cost

Capacity

Requires Research

 

none

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ToyID

ToyName

ToyValue

PurchaseCost

6466
Fake Clam
100
$185
6468
Treasure Chest
100
$185
6470
Deep Sea Diver
100
$200

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ReproductionChance:

High

SickChance:

5

ReproductionInterval(months):

5

SickChange:

-12

HappyReproduceThreshold:

96

DeathChance:

20

Offspring:

1

TimeDeath(months):

12

BabyToAdult(months):

4

 

 

SkipTrickHappiness:

 

SkipTrickChance:

 

 

SalinityChange:

-10

SalinityHealthChange:

-20

PooWaterImpact:

5

MurkyWaterThreshold:

60

MurkyWaterChange:

-5

MurkyWaterHealthChange:

-5

VeryMurkyWaterThreshold:

20

ExtremelyMurkyWaterThreshold

1

VeryMurkyWaterChange:

-10

ExtremelyMurkyWaterChange

-15

VeryMurkyWaterHealthChange:

-10

ExtremelyMurkyWaterHealthChange:

-15

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Compatible Animals

Prey Animals

mermaid

10

KeeperFoodType:

Marine Grass

 

none

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?