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AnimalID

Name

5085

Tyrannosaurus Rex

LocationName:

North America

Origin:

Dino Digs expansion

PurchaseCost:

$6,500

RequiresResearch:

Yes

IsClimber:

No

IsJumper:

Yes

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Description:

The 'Tyrant lizard king' or Tyrannosaurus Rex really lives up to its name. It is one of the largest and fiercest of the carnivorous dinosaurs. In the wild, Tyrannosaurus Rex hunts herds of herbivorous dinosaurs through humid, semi-tropical forests.

The adult Tyrannosaurus Rex is 40 feet long and 15 feet high, and its prey is often many times larger. It can use its massive jaw and six inch replaceable teeth to bring down even the plated stegosaurus. Although its short arms (roughly three feet in length) are not particularly useful in a battle, the Tyrannosaurus Rex can bring down its prey with one huge bite. It allows its prey to weaken or bleed to death before consuming it in giant 500 pound mouthfulls.

In addition to hunting the weak members of dinosaur herds, Tyrannosaurus Rex has also been known to scavenge meals. A combination of sharp eyesight and a strong sense of smell allows these massive carnivores to locate the remnants of other's kills. Tyrannosaurus Rex makes an especially good scavenger since no other dinosaur is likely to challege its right to share the bounty of a fresh kill.

Tyrannosaurus Rex is built for long distance travel, and can range over a large area in search of food. Its massive legs end in two-toed feet, and its stiff tail is used for balance. No one knows how fast a Tyrannosaurs Rex can run when it is truly in a hurry, but many guess that these creatures can travel upwards of 50mph. They seldom maintain those speeds for long, as their massive size and weight means that a fall could be fatal.

Unlike the herbivores they make their meals of, Tyrannosaurus Rex do not travel in herds. In fact, adults will often battle each other, sometimes to the death. Many Tyrannosaurus Rex carry the scars and wounds from these battles for their entire lives.

In captivity, a hungry Tyrannosaurus Rex often will eat domestic herd animals such goats and sheep if it is unable to obtain its normal diet of stegosaurus meat. But this fearsome animal will kill and consume almost any creature that is unfortunate enough to wander into its habitat. It may even even consume the occasional guest who gets a little too close.

Zookeepers, beware.

Attractiveness Adult:

Attractiveness Young:

Initial Happiness:

Habitat Preference:

100

120

50

84

Captivity:

Crowd:

CrowdHappiness Change:

ClimbsCliffs:

7

30

-20

Yes

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

To build a good animal exhibit you need to ask a few questions: (click them for the answers)

Which fence is suitable for this animal in terms of strength, if it can be climbed or jumped over?

How big should the exhibit be and what Terrain should be used?

What foliage should be used?

What rocks should be used?

What shelter does the animal need?

What toy does the animal like?

How deep should the exhibit be if using the "Pit Method"?

2 level

 

FenceName

Purchase Cost

Height

Strength

Life

Cost Effective

Reinforced Concrete Fence

$225

3

460

16

7.1

Reinforced Concrete and Glass Fence

$225

3

420

15

6.7

Concrete and Iron Bar Fence

$240

3

440

15

6.3

Electrified Chain-link Fence

$300

3

480

18

6.0

Electrified Iron Bar Fence

$350

3

400

18

5.1

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Animal Density

Min

Number of Animals/Exhibit

Max

200

1

 

1

Terrain Name

Value

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Grass

60

120

240

360

480

600

720

840

960

1080

1200

Gray stone

25

50

100

150

200

250

300

350

400

450

500

Deciduous floor

10

20

40

60

80

100

120

140

160

180

200

Fresh water

5

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

Rocks

3

24

48

72

96

120

144

168

192

216

240

Foliage

5

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

Elevation

10

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

50

Exhibit Size

100

200

400

600

800

1000

1200

1400

1600

1800

2000

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

TreeName

Foliage Effect

Cost/ Square

Cost Effective

7074

7

Broadleaf Bush

48

$260

18.5

7092

25

Monkey Puzzle Tree

30

$180

16.7

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

RockName

Size X

Size Y

Rock

Rock Effect

Purchase Cost

Cost Effective

9206

3

Small Rock

1

1

Yes

12

$55

21.8

9205

3

Medium Rock 

1

1

Yes

12

$75

16.0

9200

5

Large Rock

2

2

Yes

5

$150

3.3

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Shelter ID

Shelter Name

Shelter Value

Shelter Effect

Purchase Cost

Capacity

Requires Research

8128

Dinosaur Cave

20

10

$1800

4

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ToyID

ToyName

ToyValue

PurchaseCost

 

none

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ReproductionChance:

Low

SickChance:

40

ReproductionInterval(months):

10

SickChange:

-10

HappyReproduceThreshold:

99

DeathChance:

30

Offspring:

1

TimeDeath(months):

24

BabyToAdult(months):

3

 

LaysEggs

Yes

TimeToHatch(days)

15

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Compatible Animals

Prey Animals

none

 

KeeperFoodType:

Large meat chow

 

African Elephant

Giant Panda

Polar Bear

Chimpanzee

Plains Zebra

Thomsons Gazelle

Lion

Bengal Tiger

Siberian Tiger

Cheetah

Leopard

Black Leopard

Snow Leopard

Clouded Leopard

Jaguar

Gray Wolf

Grizzly Bear

Black Bear

Spotted Hyena

Olive Baboon

Mandrill

Lowland Gorilla

Red Kangaroo

Black Rhinocerous

Common Wildebeest

American Bison

Ibex

Okapi

Moose

African Buffalo

Gemsbok

American Bighorn Sheep

Giraffe

Dromedary Camel

Hippopotamus

Markhor

Greater Flamingo

Ostrich

Emporer Penguin

California Sea Lion

Saltwater Crocodile

Giant Anteater

African Warthog

White Bengal Tiger

Triceratops

Arctic Wolf

Unicorn

Black Buck

Bongo

Mountain Lion

Sable Antelope

Asian Black Bear

Asian Elephant

Saber-toothed cat (Smilodon)

Ankylosaurus

Gallimimus

Iguanodon

Lambeosaurus

Spinosaurus

Styracosaurus

Velociraptor

Allosaurus

Camptosaurus

Caudipteryx

Kentrosaurus

Plesiosaurus

Stegosaurus

Reindeer

Apatosaurus

Coelophysis

Herrerasaurus

Plateosaurus

Wooly Mammoth

Wooly Rhino

Giant Tortoise (Meiolania)

Zookeeper

Maintenance worker

Tour Guide

Man

Scientist

Elephant Seal
Pacific Walrus
African Wild Dog
Megatherium
Komodo Dragon
Macrauchenia
Orangutan
Malaysian Tapir
Japanese Serow
Przewalski's Wild Horse
Javan Rhinocerous
Bigfoot
Loch Ness Monster
Mexican Wolf
Marine Specialist

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?