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AnimalID

Name

5086

Saber-toothed Cat (Smilodon)

LocationName:

North America

Origin:

Dino Digs expansion

PurchaseCost:

$2,500

RequiresResearch:

No

IsClimber:

No

IsJumper:

Yes

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Description:

The Smilodon, or "knife tooth," fossil is so well known that it was named the official state fossil of California. Most people know this large mammal by its more common name--the Sabre-tooth Cat. Smilodon is actually the largest of the sabre-toothed family of cats, which also includes Hoplophoneus, Eusmilus, and Machairodus.

During the last Ice Age, Smilodon was commonly found all over both North and South America. Out of this great domain, the Sabre-toothed Cat preferred low-lying grasslands, shrub lands, and pine forests. During the Ice Age, these animals ranged far and wide to locate prey, and to avoid the enormous glaciers that covered the land. Today, your zoo may be the only place your visitors can see these magnificent felines, but early humans painted tributes to Smilodon on their cave walls more than 6,000 years ago. Unfortunately, humans also proved to be the greatest threat to Smilodon's survival, overhunting them to the edge of extinction.

Smilodon will prey on many of the large animals from the Ice Age. This ferocious predator's diet includes mammoths, mastodons, and other large mammals like Ceolodonta, the Wooly Rhinocerous. Smilodon is also known to prey on animals that are more common today, including horses, elephants, and bison.

An adult Smilodon may grow to be four feet long, with a mass of 400 pounds. Since many of Smilodon's prey animals are much larger, simple hunting techniques do not always work for the Sabre-tooth Cat. Instead, Smilodon uses the huge teeth on its upper jaw to make a deep wound in its prey. These teeth are oval in cross section, which lowers resistance as they sink into prey. They are also serrated along the rear edge, deepening the wounds they cause. After wounding prey in this manner, Smilodon can then retreat, waiting for the prey to bleed to death before returning to enjoy its meal.

 

Attractiveness Adult:

Attractiveness Young:

Initial Happiness:

Habitat Preference:

30

60

90

70

Captivity:

Crowd:

CrowdHappiness Change:

ClimbsCliffs:

2

30

-5

Yes

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

To build a good animal exhibit you need to ask a few questions: (click them for the answers)

Which fence is suitable for this animal in terms of strength, if it can be climbed or jumped over?

How big should the exhibit be and what Terrain should be used?

What foliage should be used?

What rocks should be used?

What shelter does the animal need?

What toy does the animal like?

How deep should the exhibit be if using the "Pit Method"?

2 levels

 

FenceName

Purchase Cost

Height

Strength

Life

Cost Effective

Stick Pole Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Stick Pole Window Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Chain-link Fence

$70

2

200

10

14.3

Post and Rail Fence

$90

2

250

12

13.3

Wood Slat Window Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Wooden Slat Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Rock Wall Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Rock Window Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Concrete Chain Fence

$150

2

275

14

9.3

Plexiglas Fence

$150

2

270

13

8.7

Iron Bar Fence

$180

2

290

14

7.8

Concrete Fence

$200

2

300

15

7.5

Reinforced Concrete Fence

$225

3

460

16

7.1

Reinforced Concrete and Glass Fence

$225

3

420

15

6.7

Concrete and Iron Bar Fence

$240

3

440

15

6.3

Electrified Chain-link Fence

$300

3

480

18

6.0

Electrified Iron Bar Fence

$350

3

400

18

5.1

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Animal Density

Min

Number of Animals/Exhibit

Max

50

3

 

5

Terrain Name

Value

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Gray stone

80

40

80

120

160

200

240

280

320

360

400

Snow

10

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

50

Fresh water

5

3

5

8

10

13

15

18

20

23

25

Brown stone

5

3

5

8

10

13

15

18

20

23

25

Rocks

4

8

16

24

32

40

48

56

64

72

80

Foliage

6

3

6

9

12

15

18

21

24

27

30

Elevation

20

3

5

8

10

13

15

18

20

23

25

Exhibit Size

100

50

100

150

200

250

300

350

400

450

500

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

TreeName

Foliage Effect

Cost/ Square

Cost Effective

7098

12

Arctic Bush

56

$600

9.3

7097

6

Arctic Grass

32

$400

8.0

7096

8

Arctic Birch Tree

10

$200

5.0

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

RockName

Size X

Size Y

Rock

Rock Effect

Purchase Cost

Cost Effective

9219

6

Small Snowy Rock

1

1

Yes

32

$75

42.7

9218

6

Medium Snowy Rock

1

1

Yes

32

$85

37.6

9220

8

Large Snowy Rock

2

2

Yes

10

$175

5.7

9221

8

Large Snowy Rock

2

2

Yes

10

$185

5.4

9206

2

Small Rock

1

1

Yes

8

$55

14.5

9205

2

Medium Rock 

1

1

Yes

8

$75

10.7

9200

8

Large Rock

2

2

Yes

8

$150

5.3

9211

5

Snowy Rock Formation

8

2

 

7

$700

1.0

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Shelter ID

Shelter Name

Shelter Value

Shelter Effect

Purchase Cost

Capacity

Requires Research

8102

Snowy Rock Cave

25

10

$600

4

Yes

8130

Ice Age Cave

22

7

$1,500

4

 

8100

Rock Cave

22

7

$500

4

Yes

8128

Dinosaur Cave

20

5

$1,800

4

 

8112

Large Wood Shelter 

18

3

$325

6

Yes

8111

Wood Shelter

18

3

$225

4

 

8110

Small Wood Shelter

18

3

$175

2

 

8109

Large Concrete Shelter

17

2

$225

6

Yes

8108

Concrete Shelter

17

2

$175

4

 

8107

Small Concrete Shelter

17

2

$125

2

 

8106

Large Lean-to

16

1

$650

6

Yes

8105

Lean-to

16

1

$450

4

 

8104

Small Lean-to

16

1

$250

2

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ToyID

ToyName

ToyValue

PurchaseCost

 

none

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ReproductionChance:

High

SickChance:

5

ReproductionInterval(months):

5

SickChange:

-12

HappyReproduceThreshold:

96

DeathChance:

10

Offspring:

1

TimeDeath(months):

24

BabyToAdult(months):

4

 

LaysEggs

No

TimeToHatch(days)

n/a

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Compatible Animals

Prey Animals

none

 

KeeperFoodType:

Large meat chow

 

African Elephant

Giant Panda

Chimpanzee

Plains Zebra

Thomsons Gazelle

Lion

Bengal Tiger

Siberian Tiger

Cheetah

Leopard

Black Leopard

Snow Leopard

Clouded Leopard

Jaguar

Gray Wolf

Grizzly Bear

Black Bear

Spotted Hyena

Olive Baboon

Mandrill

Lowland Gorilla

Red Kangaroo

Black Rhinocerous

Common Wildebeest

American Bison

Ibex

Okapi

Moose

African Buffalo

Gemsbok

American Bighorn Sheep

Giraffe

Dromedary Camel

Hippopotamus

Markhor

Greater Flamingo

Ostrich

Emporer Penguin

California Sea Lion

Saltwater Crocodile

Giant Anteater

African Warthog

White Bengal Tiger

Triceratops

Arctic Wolf

Unicorn

Black Buck

Bongo

Mountain Lion

Sable Antelope

Asian Black Bear

Asian Elephant

Gallimimus

Lambeosaurus

Caudipteryx

Reindeer

Wooly Mammoth

Wooly Rhino

Zookeeper

Maintenance worker

Tour Guide

Man

Scientist

Elephant Seal
Pacific Walrus
African Wild Dog
Megatherium
Macrauchenia
Orangutan
Malaysian Tapir
Japanese Serow
Przewalski's Wild Horse
Javan Rhinocerous
bigfoot
Mexican Wolf
Marine Specialist

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?