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AnimalID

Name

5327

Herrerasaurus

LocationName:

South America

Origin:

Dino Digs expansion

PurchaseCost:

$2,000

RequiresResearch:

No

IsClimber:

No

IsJumper:

Yes

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Description:

At one time considered the earliest dinosaur to ever live, Herrerasaurus, or "Herrera's lizard" was named for a rancher in Argentina, where the dinosaur's fossils were first discovered. Although rather small in comparison to its later relatives like T. rex, at ten feet in length, Herrerasaurus was plenty big for its time and was a dominant carnivore. It was also the first to evolve many important adaptations which predatory dinos continued to possess for millions of years.

About 10 feet long from snout to tail, Herrerasaurus runs on its hind legs and is fast enough to run down fleeing prey. Its arms are about half the length of its legs, and are each tipped by three sharp claws for grasping and tearing flesh. Herrerasaurus' sharp teeth are curved towards the back of its mouth to prevent prey from wriggling free. It even has a flexible hinged joint in its lower jaw to let it wrap its mouth around the struggling reptiles it eats.

Catching its prey with raw speed is not the only way that Herrerasaurus likes to hunt. Its rough textured skin is colored to help it blend into the thick vegetation surrounding lakes and rivers. Using this camouflage, Herrerasaurus can conserve precious energy and ambush prey that walk by.

Herrerasaurus is equally at home in near-desert environments. Hunting with a partner or two in rocky areas, Herrerasaurus snaps up small reptiles flushed from hiding by the group. The penultimate predator of its time, Herrerasaurus was ready and equipped to eat almost any of its contemporaries. Your zoo staff should not have a hard time finding things to feed this least-picky of predators.

.

Attractiveness Adult:

Attractiveness Young:

Initial Happiness:

Habitat Preference:

80

100

50

90

Captivity:

Crowd:

CrowdHappiness Change:

ClimbsCliffs:

7

30

-20

Yes

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

To build a good animal exhibit you need to ask a few questions: (click them for the answers)

Which fence is suitable for this animal in terms of strength, if it can be climbed or jumped over?

How big should the exhibit be and what Terrain should be used?

What foliage should be used?

What rocks should be used?

What shelter does the animal need?

What toy does the animal like?

How deep should the exhibit be if using the "Pit Method"?

2 levels

 

FenceName

Purchase Cost

Height

Strength

Life

Cost Effective

Stick Pole Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Stick Pole Window Fence

$75

2

225

12

16.0

Chain-link Fence

$70

2

200

10

14.3

Post and Rail Fence

$90

2

250

12

13.3

Wood Slat Window Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Wooden Slat Fence

$110

2

240

12

10.9

Rock Wall Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Rock Window Fence

$150

2

280

14

9.3

Concrete Chain Fence

$150

2

275

14

9.3

Plexiglas Fence

$150

2

270

13

8.7

Iron Bar Fence

$180

2

290

14

7.8

Concrete Fence

$200

2

300

15

7.5

Reinforced Concrete Fence

$225

3

460

16

7.1

Reinforced Concrete and Glass Fence

$225

3

420

15

6.7

Concrete and Iron Bar Fence

$240

3

440

15

6.3

Electrified Chain-link Fence

$300

3

480

18

6.0

Electrified Iron Bar Fence

$350

3

400

18

5.1

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Animal Density

Min

Number of Animals/Exhibit

Max

100

1

 

3

Terrain Name

Value

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Rainforest floor

80

80

160

240

320

400

480

560

640

720

800

Grass

10

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

Fresh water

10

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

Rocks

2

8

16

24

32

40

48

56

64

72

80

Foliage

7

7

14

21

28

35

42

49

56

63

70

Elevation

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Exhibit Size

100

100

200

300

400

500

600

700

800

900

1000

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

TreeName

Foliage Effect

Cost/ Square

Cost Effective

7090

16

Leptocycas Tree

104

 $500

 20.8

7082

14

Thouarsus Cycad Tree

96

$560

17.1

7014

13

Mangrove Tree

92

$620

14.8

7005

12

Ulmo Tree

88

$480

18.3

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

RockName

Size X

Size Y

Rock

Rock Effect

Purchase Cost

Cost Effective

9215

14

Stone Ruins

4

2

Yes

24

$450

5.3

9226

13

Rainforest Rock

6

4

Yes

23

$350

6.6

9206

3

Small Rock

1

1

Yes

12

$55

21.8

9205

3

Medium Rock 

1

1

Yes

12

$75

16.0

9200

5

Large Rock

2

2

Yes

5

$150

3.3

9217

16

Jungle Rock Formation

8

2

 

26

$500

5.2

9213

16

Waterfall Rock Formation

8

8

 

26

$1,400

1.9

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Shelter ID

Shelter Name

Shelter Value

Shelter Effect

Purchase Cost

Capacity

Requires Research

 

none

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ToyID

ToyName

ToyValue

PurchaseCost

 

none

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ReproductionChance:

Low

SickChance:

20

ReproductionInterval(months):

10

SickChange:

-10

HappyReproduceThreshold:

95

DeathChance:

10

Offspring:

1

TimeDeath(months):

24

BabyToAdult(months):

3

 

LaysEggs

Yes

TimeToHatch(days)

13

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Compatible Animals

Prey Animals

Coelophysis

25

KeeperFoodType:

Large meat chow

 

Giant Panda

Polar Bear

Chimpanzee

Plains Zebra

Thomsons Gazelle

Lion

Bengal Tiger

Siberian Tiger

Cheetah

Leopard

Black Leopard

Snow Leopard

Clouded Leopard

Jaguar

Gray Wolf

Grizzly Bear

Black Bear

Spotted Hyena

Olive Baboon

Mandrill

Red Kangaroo

Black Rhinocerous

Common Wildebeest

American Bison

Ibex

Okapi

Moose

African Buffalo

Gemsbok

American Bighorn Sheep

Giraffe

Dromedary Camel

Hippopotamus

Markhor

Greater Flamingo

Ostrich

Emporer Penguin

California Sea Lion

Saltwater Crocodile

Giant Anteater

African Warthog

White Bengal Tiger

Arctic Wolf

Unicorn

Black Buck

Bongo

Mountain Lion

Sable Antelope

Saber-toothed cat (Smilodon)

Gallimimus

Lambeosaurus

Spinosaurus

Caudipteryx

Reindeer

Wooly Mammoth

Wooly Rhino

Giant Tortoise (Meiolania)

Zookeeper

Maintenance worker

Tour Guide

Man

Scientist

Elephant Seal
Pacific Walrus
African Wild Dog
Megatherium
Komodo Dragon
Macrauchenia
Orangutan
Malaysian Tapir
Japanese Serow
Przewalski's Wild Horse
Javan Rhinocerous
Bigfoot
Mexican Wolf
Marine Specialist

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?