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AnimalID

Name

5094

Allosaurus

LocationName:

North America

Origin:

Dino Digs expansion

PurchaseCost:

$4,500

RequiresResearch:

No

IsClimber:

No

IsJumper:

Yes

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Description:

At their peak in the Late Jurassic, packs of flesh-eating Allosaurus roamed throughout much of North America, Africa, and Australia. A pack of hungry, thirty-six-foot-long, two-ton carnivores arriving on the scene is enough to frighten herds of larger dinosaurs. A pack of Allosaurus will cull the weak, sick, or young members out of a grazing herd of Apatosaurus or Stegosaurus. The Allosaurus pack works together to make the kill and protect themselves from the rest of the prey's herd.

Its larger and more famous cousin, Tyrannosaurus Rex, sometimes overshadows the Allosaurus--even the name Allosaurus means "other lizard." Both of these hunters are members of the Theropod or "Beast Foot" order of dinosaurs. Although shorter than the T. Rex in length, the Allosaurus stands just as high as its cousin. Because Allosaurus will work together as a pack, they can prey on even larger dinosaurs then the T. Rex. Moreover, the smaller Allosaurus can run much faster than their heavier relatives, allowing them to capture swifter and more agile prey.

The Allosaurus has a huge head with knobs and small horns over the eyes. A hinged jaw allows the Allosaurus to take huge bites with its sharp and narrow teeth, useful for bringing down its prey and consuming it afterwards. The Allosaurus has an unusually strong neck for a predatory dinosaur in order to support its powerful head. The supporting bones of its neck curve in the shape of an S. Allosaurus is a bipedal dinosaur, walking upright on its two massive legs. It arms are short in order to maintain balance. However, each arm has three razor-sharp six-inch claws, so they are not useless appendages.

The long tail of the Allosaurus is very stiff and heavy, so that it can be used to balance the creature's massive head. This permits Allosaurus to travel quickly in pursuit of prey. Each of the heavy legs has three big toes that serve to support its weight, and a tiny back toe with a sharp claw. This extra claw combined with the size and weight of its legs makes this dinosaurís kick something best avoided.

 

Attractiveness Adult:

Attractiveness Young:

Initial Happiness:

Habitat Preference:

80

180

50

84

Captivity:

Crowd:

CrowdHappiness Change:

ClimbsCliffs:

10

30

-20

Yes

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

To build a good animal exhibit you need to ask a few questions: (click them for the answers)

Which fence is suitable for this animal in terms of strength, if it can be climbed or jumped over?

How big should the exhibit be and what Terrain should be used?

What foliage should be used?

What rocks should be used?

What shelter does the animal need?

What toy does the animal like?

How deep should the exhibit be if using the "Pit Method"?

2 levels

 

FenceName

Purchase Cost

Height

Strength

Life

Cost Effective

Reinforced Concrete Fence

$225

3

460

16

7.1

Reinforced Concrete and Glass Fence

$225

3

420

15

6.7

Concrete and Iron Bar Fence

$240

3

440

15

6.3

Electrified Chain-link Fence

$300

3

480

18

6.0

Electrified Iron Bar Fence

$350

3

400

18

5.1

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Animal Density

Min

Number of Animals/Exhibit

Max

200

1

 

3

Terrain Name

Value

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Rainforest floor

70

140

280

420

560

700

840

980

1120

1260

1400

Grass

20

40

80

120

160

200

240

280

320

360

400

Fresh water

10

20

40

60

80

100

120

140

160

180

200

Rocks

2

16

32

48

64

80

96

112

128

144

160

Foliage

5

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

Elevation

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Exhibit Size

100

200

400

600

800

1000

1200

1400

1600

1800

2000

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

TreeName

Foliage Effect

Cost/ Square

Cost Effective

7085

 18

Fern Bush 

 112

 $400

 28.0

7049

14

Rainforest Bush

96

$200

48.0

7014

12

Mangrove Tree

88

$620

14.2

7015

16

Elephant Ear Tree

26

$185

14.1

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ID

Value

RockName

Size X

Size Y

Rock

Rock Effect

Purchase Cost

Cost Effective

9215

16

Stone Ruins

4

2

Yes

26

$450

5.8

9206

3

Small Rock

1

1

Yes

12

$55

21.8

9205

3

Medium Rock 

1

1

Yes

12

$75

16.0

9200

5

Large Rock

2

2

Yes

5

$150

3.3

9217

18

Jungle Rock Formation

8

2

 

28

$500

5.6

9213

18

Waterfall Rock Formation

8

8

 

28

$1,400

2.0

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Shelter ID

Shelter Name

Shelter Value

Shelter Effect

Purchase Cost

Capacity

Requires Research

8128

Dinosaur Cave

20

10

$1,800

4

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ToyID

ToyName

ToyValue

PurchaseCost

 

none

 

 

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

ReproductionChance:

Low

SickChance:

20

ReproductionInterval(months):

5

SickChange:

-10

HappyReproduceThreshold:

97

DeathChance:

45

Offspring:

1

TimeDeath(months):

36

BabyToAdult(months):

6

 

LaysEggs

Yes

TimeToHatch(days)

7

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?

 

Compatible Animals

Prey Animals

none

 

KeeperFoodType:

Large meat chow

 

African Elephant

Giant Panda

Polar Bear

Chimpanzee

Plains Zebra

Thomsons Gazelle

Lion

Bengal Tiger

Siberian Tiger

Cheetah

Leopard

Black Leopard

Snow Leopard

Clouded Leopard

Jaguar

Gray Wolf

Grizzly Bear

Black Bear

Spotted Hyena

Olive Baboon

Mandrill

Lowland Gorilla

Red Kangaroo

Black Rhinocerous

Common Wildebeest

American Bison

Ibex

Okapi

Moose

African Buffalo

Gemsbok

American Bighorn Sheep

Giraffe

Dromedary Camel

Hippopotamus

Markhor

Greater Flamingo

Ostrich

Emporer Penguin

California Sea Lion

Saltwater Crocodile

Giant Anteater

African Warthog

White Bengal Tiger

Triceratops

Arctic Wolf

Unicorn

Black Buck

Bongo

Mountain Lion

Sable Antelope

Asian Black Bear

Asian Elephant

Saber-toothed cat (Smilodon)

Ankylosaurus

Gallimimus

Iguanodon

Lambeosaurus

Spinosaurus

Styracosaurus

Velociraptor

Camptosaurus

Caudipteryx

Kentrosaurus

Plesiosaurus

Stegosaurus

Reindeer

Apatosaurus

Coelophysis

Herrerasaurus

Plateosaurus

Wooly Mammoth

Wooly Rhino

Giant Tortoise (Meiolania)

Zookeeper

Maintenance worker

Tour Guide

Man

Scientist

Elephant Seal
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African Wild Dog
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Macrauchenia
Orangutan
Malaysian Tapir
Japanese Serow
Przewalski's Wild Horse
Javan Rhinocerous
Bigfoot
Loch Ness Monster
Mexican Wolf
Marine Specialist

 

General Information

Building an Exhibit

The Life Cycle

Who do they like to live with and eat?